Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDondorp, Arjen M
dc.contributor.authorFanello, Caterina I
dc.contributor.authorHendriksen, Ilse C E
dc.contributor.authorGomes, Ermelinda
dc.contributor.authorSeni, Amir
dc.contributor.authorChhaganlal, Kajal D
dc.contributor.authorBojang, Kalifa
dc.contributor.authorOlaosebikan, Rasaq
dc.contributor.authorAnunobi, Nkechinyere
dc.contributor.authorMaitland, Kathryn
dc.contributor.authorKivaya, Esther
dc.contributor.authorAgbenyega, Tsiri
dc.contributor.authorNguah, Samuel Blay
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorGesase, Samwel
dc.contributor.authorKahabuka, Catherine
dc.contributor.authorMtove, George
dc.contributor.authorNadjm, Behzad
dc.contributor.authorDeen, Jacqueline
dc.contributor.authorMwanga-Amumpaire, Juliet
dc.contributor.authorNansumba, Margaret
dc.contributor.authorKarema, Corine
dc.contributor.authorUmulisa, Noella
dc.contributor.authorUwimana, Aline
dc.contributor.authorMokuolu, Olugbenga A
dc.contributor.authorAdedoyin, Olanrewaju T
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Wahab B R
dc.contributor.authorTshefu, Antoinette K
dc.contributor.authorOnyamboko, Marie A
dc.contributor.authorSakulthaew, Tharisara
dc.contributor.authorNgum, Wirichada Pan
dc.contributor.authorSilamut, Kamolrat
dc.contributor.authorStepniewska, Kasia
dc.contributor.authorWoodrow, Charles J
dc.contributor.authorBethell, Delia
dc.contributor.authorWills, Bridget
dc.contributor.authorOneko, Martina
dc.contributor.authorPeto, Tim E
dc.contributor.authorvon Seidlein, Lorenz
dc.contributor.authorDay, Nicholas P J
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Nicholas J
dc.contributor.authorAQUAMAT group
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-20T17:12:27Z
dc.date.available2011-01-20T17:12:27Z
dc.date.issued2010-11-08
dc.date.submitted2011-01-19
dc.identifier.citationLancet 2010;376(9753):1647-57en
dc.identifier.issn1474-547X
dc.identifier.pmid21062666
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0140-6736(10)61924-1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/120099
dc.description.abstractSevere malaria is a major cause of childhood death and often the main reason for paediatric hospital admission in sub-Saharan Africa. Quinine is still the established treatment of choice, although evidence from Asia suggests that artesunate is associated with a lower mortality. We compared parenteral treatment with either artesunate or quinine in African children with severe malaria.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(10)61924-1/abstracten
dc.rightsReproduced on this site with permission of Elsevier Ltd. Please see [url]http://www.thelancet.com/[/url] for further relevant comment.en
dc.subject.meshAfrica South of the Saharaen
dc.subject.meshAntimalarialsen
dc.subject.meshArtemisininsen
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshKaplan-Meier Estimateen
dc.subject.meshMalaria, Falciparumen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshQuinineen
dc.subject.meshSurvival Rateen
dc.titleArtesunate versus quinine in the treatment of severe falciparum malaria in African children (AQUAMAT): an open-label, randomised trialen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHospital Central da Beira, Beira, Mozambique; MRC laboratories, Banjul, The Gambia; Komfo Anokye Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana; Kilifi District General Hospital, Kilifi, Kenya; Magunga District Hospital, NIMR-Korogwe Research Laboratory, Tanga, Tanzania; Teule Designated District Hospital, Muheza, Tanzania; NIMR-Amani Centre, Tanga, Tanzania; Malaria Control Program, Ministry of Health, Kigali, Rwanda; University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria; Mbarara University of Science and Technology and Epicentre Research Base, Mbarara, Uganda; Kinshasa School of Public Health—Kingasani Research Centre, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo; Mahidol Oxford Tropical MedicineResearch Unit (MORU), Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; Menzies School of Health Research, Casuarina, NT, Australia; Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam; KEMRI—CDC Kisumu, Kisumu Kenyaen
dc.identifier.journalLanceten
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T08:37:08Z
html.description.abstractSevere malaria is a major cause of childhood death and often the main reason for paediatric hospital admission in sub-Saharan Africa. Quinine is still the established treatment of choice, although evidence from Asia suggests that artesunate is associated with a lower mortality. We compared parenteral treatment with either artesunate or quinine in African children with severe malaria.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
101108_Dondorp_AQUAMAT_Lancet- ...
Size:
398.1Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Main article

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record