• Barriers to access to visceral leishmaniasis diagnosis and care among seasonal mobile workers in Western Tigray, Northern Ethiopia: A qualitative study

      Coulborn, RM; Gebrehiwot, TG; Schneider, M; Gerstl, S; Adera, C; Herrero, M; Porten, K; den Boer, M; Ritmeijer, K; Alvar, J; et al. (PLoS, 2018-11-08)
      Ethiopia bears a high burden of visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Early access to VL diagnosis and care improves clinical prognosis and reduces transmission from infected humans; however, significant obstacles exist. The approximate 250,000 seasonal mobile workers (MW) employed annually in northwestern Ethiopia may be particularly disadvantaged and at risk of VL acquisition and death. Our study aimed to assess barriers, and recommend interventions to increase access, to VL diagnosis and care among MWs.
    • Long-term Clinical Outcomes in Visceral Leishmaniasis-HIV Co-infected Patients during and after Pentamidine Secondary Prophylaxis in Ethiopia: a single-arm clinical trial

      Diro, E; Ritmeijer, K; Boelaert, M; Alves, F; Mohammed, R; Abongomera, C; Ravinetto, R; De Crop, M; Fikre, H; Adera, C; et al. (Oxford University Press, 2017-09-13)
      We have conducted a single-arm trial evaluating monthly pentamidine secondary prophylaxis (PSP) to prevent visceral leishmaniasis (VL) relapse in Ethiopian HIV-patients. Outcomes at 12 months of PSP have been previously reported, supporting PSP effectiveness and safety. However, remaining relapse-free after PSP discontinuation is vital. We now report outcomes and associated factors for a period of upto 2.5 years after initiating PSP, including one year follow-up after PSP discontinuation.
    • Severe post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis successfully treated with miltefosine in an Ethiopian HIV patient.

      Abongomera, C; Battaglioli, T; Adera, C; Ritmeijer, K (Elsevier, 2019-02-18)
      Post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) is a neglected tropical disease characterized by a dermatosis which often appears after successful treatment of visceral leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania donovani. PKDL treatment options are few and have severe limitations. In East- Africa, the standard treatment of PKDL is with daily painful potentially toxic sodium stibogluconate injections, administered for a prolonged duration of 30-60 days. In the Indian subcontinent, PKDL is mainly treated with miltefosine, a safer orally administered drug. However, in East-Africa, there is very limited experience in the use of miltefosine for treatment of severe PKDL, with only one published case report. Here we report a severe PKDL case in an Ethiopian HIV patient successfully treated with oral miltefosine (100 milligrams/day for 28 days). Miltefosine was efficacious, safe and well tolerated, suggesting that it can play an important role in the treatment of severe PKDL also in East-African patients. Further research is warranted.