• Diagnostic accuracy of two rK39 antigen-based dipsticks and the formol gel test for rapid diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis in northeastern Uganda.

      Chappuis, F; Mueller, Y; Nguimfack, A; Rwakimari, J; Couffignal, S; Boelaert, M; Cavailler, P; Loutan, L; Piola, P; Travel and Migration Medicine Unit, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Micheli-du-Crest 24, 1211 Geneva 14, Switzerland. francois.chappuis@hcuge.ch (American Society for Microbiology, 2005-12)
      The development of an accurate, practical, and affordable diagnostic test is essential to improve the management of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in remote health centers. We evaluated the Formol Gel test (FGT) and two rK39 antigen-based dipsticks, the DUAL-IT L/M, and the Kalazar Detect for VL diagnosis in Amudat Hospital in Uganda. The DUAL-IT L/M was also evaluated for the diagnosis of malaria. All patients clinically suspect of VL were prospectively included in the study between October 2003 and March 2004. The gold standard used to define a VL case was a positive spleen aspirate or a direct agglutination test titer of >1:12,800 with an appropriate clinical response to antileishmanial therapy. A total of 131 VL and 112 non-VL patients were included in the analysis. The DUAL IT L/M was found to be more sensitive than the Kalazar Detect: 97% (95% confidence interval [95%CI] = 92 to 99%) versus 82% (95%CI = 74 to 87%). The Kalazar Detect and the DUAL IT L/M were highly specific (99% [95%CI = 95 to 100%] and 97% [95%CI = 92 to 99%], respectively). The FGT lacked both sensitivity (66% [95%CI = 57 to 73%]) and specificity (90% [95%CI = 83 to 94%]). The sensitivity of the DUAL IT L/M for malaria was only 57% (95%CI = 37 to 76%). The two rK39 dipsticks can be used for diagnostic confirmation of VL in this region. The DUAL-IT L/M without its malaria diagnostic component (DiaMed-IT LEISH) will be adopted as first-line test for VL in Uganda.
    • Safety and Effectiveness of Amphotericin B Deoxycholate for the Treatment of Visceral Leishmaniasis in Uganda.

      Mueller, Y; Nguimfack, A; Cavailler, P; Couffignal, S; Rwakimari, J B; Loutan, L; Chappuis, F; Médecins Sans Frontières, Swiss Section, Rue de Lausanne 78, 1202 Geneva, Switzerland. yolanda.mueller@freesurf.ch (Maney Publishing, 2008-01)
      Between September 2003 and April 2004, the supply of antimonial drugs to Amudat Hospital, in north-eastern Uganda, was interrupted and all cases of visceral leishmaniasis presenting at the hospital could only be treated with amphotericin B deoxycholate (AmB). This allowed the safety and effectiveness of the AmB to be evaluated, in comparison with an historical cohort of patients treated, at the same hospital, with meglumine antimoniate (Sb(V)). Demographic and clinical data were collected before and after treatment. Adverse effects were recorded passively in all the subjects, and actively, using a standardized questionnaire, in a sub-group of the patients given AmB. The in hospital case-fatality 'rates' were 4.8% [95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.4%-8.8%] among the 210 patients treated with AmB and 3.7% (CI = 1.4%-7.9%) among the 161 patients treated with Sb(V) (P>0.20). Adverse effects requiring treatment interruption were rare in both cohorts. Treatment failures (i.e. non-responses or relapses) were observed in 2.9% (CI = 1.2%-6.4%) of the patients treated with AmB and 1.2% (CI = 0.1%-4.4%) of the patients treated with Sb(V) (P>0.20). For the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis in Uganda, AmB therefore had a similar effectiveness and safety profile to that of meglumine antimoniate.