• Comparative cost-effectiveness analysis of two MSF surgical trauma centers

      Gosselin, R A; Maldonado, A; Elder, G; School of Public Health, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Paris, France (2010-09-22)
      INTRODUCTION: There is a dearth of data on cost-effectiveness of surgical care in resource-poor countries. Doctors Without Borders (Médecins Sans Frontières; MSF) is a nongovernmental organization (NGO) involved in the many facets of health care for underserved populations, including surgical care. METHODS: A cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) was attempted at two of their surgical trauma hospitals: Teme Hospital in Nigeria and La Trinité Hospital in Haiti. CONCLUSION: At $172 and $223 per Disability-Adjusted Life-Year (DALY) averted, respectively, they are in line with other reported CEAs for surgical and nonsurgical activities in similar contexts.
    • Médecins Sans Frontières Experience in Orthopedic Surgery in Postearthquake Haiti in 2010

      Teicher, C L; Alberti, K; Porten, K; Elder, G; Baron, E; Herard, P (Cambridge University Press, 2014-01-15)
      Introduction During January 2010, a 7.0 magnitude earthquake struck Haiti, resulting in death and destruction for hundreds of thousands of people. This study describes the types of orthopedic procedures performed, the options for patient follow-up, and limitations in obtaining outcomes data in an emergency setting. Problem There is not a large body of data that describes larger orthopedic cohorts, especially those focusing on internal fixation surgeries in resource-poor settings in postdisaster regions. This article describes 248 injuries and over 300 procedures carried out in the Médecins Sans Frontières-Orthopedic Centre Paris orthopedic program.
    • Multidrug-Resistant Surgical Site Infections in a Humanitarian Surgery Project

      Murphy, RA; Okoli, O; Essien, I; Teicher, C; Elder, G; Pena, J; Ronat, JB; Bernabé, KJ (Cambridge University Press, 2016-08-11)
      The epidemiology of surgical site infections (SSIs) in surgical programmes in sub-Saharan Africa is inadequately described. We reviewed deep and organ-space SSIs occurring within a trauma project that had a high-quality microbiology partnership and active follow-up. Included patients underwent orthopaedic surgery in Teme Hospital (Port Harcourt, Nigeria) for trauma and subsequently developed a SSI requiring debridement and microbiological sampling. Data were collected from structured chart reviews and programmatic databases for 103 patients with suspected SSI [79% male, median age 30 years, interquartile range (IQR) 24-37]. SSIs were commonly detected post-discharge with 58% presenting >28 days after surgery. The most common pathogens were: Staphylococcus aureus (34%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (16%) and Enterobacter cloacae (11%). Thirty-three (32%) of infections were caused by a multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogen, including 15 patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Antibiotics were initiated empirically for 43% of patients and after culture and sensitivity report in 32%. The median number of additional surgeries performed in patients with SSI was 5 (IQR 2-6), one patient died (1%), and amputation was performed or recommended in three patients. Our findings suggest the need for active long-term monitoring of SSIs, particularly those associated with MDR organisms, resulting in increased costs for readmission surgery and treatment with late-generation antibiotics.