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dc.contributor.authorHepple, P
dc.contributor.authorNovoa-Cain, J
dc.contributor.authorCheruiyot, C
dc.contributor.authorRichter, E
dc.contributor.authorRitmeijer, K
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-24T23:01:13Z
dc.date.available2011-03-24T23:01:13Z
dc.date.issued2011-03
dc.identifier.citationImplementation of liquid culture for tuberculosis diagnosis in a remote setting: lessons learned. 2011, 15 (3):405-7 Int. J. Tuberc. Lung Dis.en
dc.identifier.issn1815-7920
dc.identifier.pmid21333111
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/125630
dc.description.abstractAlthough sputum smear microscopy is the primary method for tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis in low-resource settings, it has low sensitivity. The World Health Organization recommends the use of liquid culture techniques for TB diagnosis and drug susceptibility testing in low- and middle-income countries. An evaluation of samples from southern Sudan found that culture was able to detect cases of active pulmonary TB and extra-pulmonary TB missed by conventional smear microscopy. However, the long delays involved in obtaining culture results meant that they were usually not clinically useful, and high rates of non-tuberculous mycobacteria isolation made interpretation of results difficult. Improvements in diagnostic capacity and rapid speciation facilities, either on-site or through a local reference laboratory, are crucial.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease : the official journal of the International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseaseen
dc.titleImplementation of liquid culture for tuberculosis diagnosis in a remote setting: lessons learned.en
dc.contributor.departmentMédecins Sans Frontières, Manson Unit, London, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseaseen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T08:39:41Z
html.description.abstractAlthough sputum smear microscopy is the primary method for tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis in low-resource settings, it has low sensitivity. The World Health Organization recommends the use of liquid culture techniques for TB diagnosis and drug susceptibility testing in low- and middle-income countries. An evaluation of samples from southern Sudan found that culture was able to detect cases of active pulmonary TB and extra-pulmonary TB missed by conventional smear microscopy. However, the long delays involved in obtaining culture results meant that they were usually not clinically useful, and high rates of non-tuberculous mycobacteria isolation made interpretation of results difficult. Improvements in diagnostic capacity and rapid speciation facilities, either on-site or through a local reference laboratory, are crucial.


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