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dc.contributor.authorLacoux, P A*
dc.contributor.authorLassalle, X*
dc.contributor.authorMcGoldrick, P M*
dc.contributor.authorCrombie, I K*
dc.contributor.authorMacrae, W A*
dc.date.accessioned2008-01-31T17:07:01Z
dc.date.available2008-01-31T17:07:01Z
dc.date.issued2008-01-31T17:07:01Z
dc.identifier.citationField research in humanitarian medical programmes. Treatment of neuropathic pain in Sierra Leone., 97 (6):619-21 Trans. R. Soc. Trop. Med. Hyg.en
dc.identifier.issn0035-9203
dc.identifier.pmid16134259
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/17297
dc.description.abstractA pilot study was carried out among 223 war wounded and amputees in Sierra Leone in 2001 to investigate whether an intervention using proven medication for clinically diagnosed neuropathic pain would work in a developing country with limited health services. Compliance with medication was assessed in 79 patients and their pain and mood scores were assessed by questionnaire before medication and 6-10 months later. The pain and mood scores of 33 patients who stopped taking medication were compared for the initial and follow-up assessments indicating that, although the scores showed an improvement at follow-up, there was no significant improvement. Compliance was reasonable in 46 patients who continued with their medication, with 86.5% of possible doses collected although many had difficulty understanding how to take the drugs properly. Their pain and mood scores showed significant improvement at reassessment indicating that pain will be reduced with a longer duration of treatment. This study showed that it is possible to run an effective intervention for neuropathic pain in Sierra Leone with intermittent expert involvement and MSF have been able to develop a protocol for the assessment and treatment of neuropathic pain that may be useful in other difficult settings in which they work.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/00359203
dc.rightsArchived on this site with the kind permission of Elsevier Ltd. and the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, http://www.rstmh.org/transactions.aspen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAmitriptylineen
dc.subject.meshAmputeesen
dc.subject.meshAnalgesics, Non-Narcoticen
dc.subject.meshCarbamazepineen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshPainen
dc.subject.meshPain Clinicsen
dc.subject.meshPain Measurementen
dc.subject.meshPatient Complianceen
dc.subject.meshPatient Satisfactionen
dc.subject.meshPilot Projectsen
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen
dc.subject.meshSierra Leoneen
dc.subject.meshWounds and Injuriesen
dc.titleField research in humanitarian medical programmes. Treatment of neuropathic pain in Sierra Leone.en
dc.contributor.departmentMédecins Sans Frontières, Paris, France. phil@lacoux.u-net.comen
dc.identifier.journalTransactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygieneen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T09:04:41Z
html.description.abstractA pilot study was carried out among 223 war wounded and amputees in Sierra Leone in 2001 to investigate whether an intervention using proven medication for clinically diagnosed neuropathic pain would work in a developing country with limited health services. Compliance with medication was assessed in 79 patients and their pain and mood scores were assessed by questionnaire before medication and 6-10 months later. The pain and mood scores of 33 patients who stopped taking medication were compared for the initial and follow-up assessments indicating that, although the scores showed an improvement at follow-up, there was no significant improvement. Compliance was reasonable in 46 patients who continued with their medication, with 86.5% of possible doses collected although many had difficulty understanding how to take the drugs properly. Their pain and mood scores showed significant improvement at reassessment indicating that pain will be reduced with a longer duration of treatment. This study showed that it is possible to run an effective intervention for neuropathic pain in Sierra Leone with intermittent expert involvement and MSF have been able to develop a protocol for the assessment and treatment of neuropathic pain that may be useful in other difficult settings in which they work.


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