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dc.contributor.authorMarlet, M V L
dc.contributor.authorWuillaume, F
dc.contributor.authorJacquet, D
dc.contributor.authorQuispe, K W
dc.contributor.authorDujardin, J C
dc.contributor.authorBoelaert, M
dc.date.accessioned2008-02-07T16:21:25Z
dc.date.available2008-02-07T16:21:25Z
dc.date.issued2008-02-07T16:21:25Z
dc.identifier.citationA neglected disease of humans: a new focus of visceral leishmaniasis in Bakool, Somalia., 97 (6):667-71 Trans. R. Soc. Trop. Med. Hyg.en
dc.identifier.issn0035-9203
dc.identifier.pmid16117959
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/17719
dc.description.abstractVisceral leishmaniasis (VL) was observed in children in Bakool region, Somalia, an area where VL has not been reported before. We describe the extent of the problem in this war- and famine-stricken area. A retrospective analysis was done of all cases admitted to a VL treatment centre between July 2000 and August 2001. Patients with longstanding fever, splenomegaly and a positive direct agglutination test (DAT; titre > 1:3200) were treated as suspected VL cases. A rapid epidemiological and entomological assessment was performed in the area. Species identification was attempted from blood samples by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of cysteine proteinase B genes. In 1 year, 230 serologically-positive cases were diagnosed as VL, and response to therapy was good in 91.6% of the 225 treated with sodium stibogluconate. Parasitological confirmation was attempted and obtained in 2 cases. Parasites were found to be most similar to Sudanese and Ethiopian reference strains of the Leishmania donovani complex. In a serological survey of 161 healthy displaced persons, 15% were positive by the leishmanin skin test and 3 (2%) were positive by the DAT. The sandfly captures showed Phlebotomus martini and P. vansomerenae. VL seems to be a longstanding and serious health problem in Bakool region. Food insecurity might have contributed to the emergence and detection of VL in this area.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/00359203
dc.rightsArchived on this site with the kind permission of Elsevier Ltd. and the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, http://www.rstmh.org/transactions.aspen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAge Distributionen
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshAntimony Sodium Gluconateen
dc.subject.meshAntiprotozoal Agentsen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshCysteine Endopeptidasesen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshLeishmania donovanien
dc.subject.meshLeishmaniasis, Visceralen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshSex Distributionen
dc.subject.meshSomaliaen
dc.titleA neglected disease of humans: a new focus of visceral leishmaniasis in Bakool, Somalia.en
dc.contributor.departmentMédecins sans Frontières, Dupréstraat 94, B-1090 Brussels, Belgium.en
dc.identifier.journalTransactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygieneen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T09:11:15Z
html.description.abstractVisceral leishmaniasis (VL) was observed in children in Bakool region, Somalia, an area where VL has not been reported before. We describe the extent of the problem in this war- and famine-stricken area. A retrospective analysis was done of all cases admitted to a VL treatment centre between July 2000 and August 2001. Patients with longstanding fever, splenomegaly and a positive direct agglutination test (DAT; titre > 1:3200) were treated as suspected VL cases. A rapid epidemiological and entomological assessment was performed in the area. Species identification was attempted from blood samples by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of cysteine proteinase B genes. In 1 year, 230 serologically-positive cases were diagnosed as VL, and response to therapy was good in 91.6% of the 225 treated with sodium stibogluconate. Parasitological confirmation was attempted and obtained in 2 cases. Parasites were found to be most similar to Sudanese and Ethiopian reference strains of the Leishmania donovani complex. In a serological survey of 161 healthy displaced persons, 15% were positive by the leishmanin skin test and 3 (2%) were positive by the DAT. The sandfly captures showed Phlebotomus martini and P. vansomerenae. VL seems to be a longstanding and serious health problem in Bakool region. Food insecurity might have contributed to the emergence and detection of VL in this area.


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