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dc.contributor.authorCox, H
dc.contributor.authorOrozco, J D
dc.contributor.authorMale, R
dc.contributor.authorRuesch-Gerdes, S
dc.contributor.authorFalzon, D
dc.contributor.authorSmall, I
dc.contributor.authorDoshetov, D
dc.contributor.authorKebede, Y
dc.contributor.authorAziz, M
dc.date.accessioned2008-02-07T16:42:32Z
dc.date.available2008-02-07T16:42:32Z
dc.date.issued2004-05
dc.identifier.citationMultidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Central Asia. 2004, 10 (5):865-72 Emerging Infect. Dis.en
dc.identifier.issn1080-6040
dc.identifier.pmid15200821
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/17739
dc.description.abstractMultidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has emerged as a major threat to TB control, particularly in the former Soviet Union. To determine levels of drug resistance within a directly observed treatment strategy (DOTS) program supported by Médecins Sans Frontières in two regions in Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan, Central Asia, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of smear-positive TB patients in selected districts of Karakalpakstan (Uzbekistan) and Dashoguz (Turkmenistan). High levels of MDR-TB were found in both regions. In Karakalpakstan, 14 (13%) of 106 new patients were infected with MDR-TB; 43 (40%) of 107 previously treated patients were similarly infected. The proportions for Dashoguz were 4% (4/105 patients) and 18% (18/98 patients), respectively. Overall, 27% of patients with positive smear results whose infections were treated through the DOTS program in Karakalpakstan and 11% of similar patients in Dashoguz were infected with multidrug-resistant strains of TB on admission. These results show the need for concerted action by the international community to contain transmission and reduce the effects of MDR-TB.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/eid
dc.rightsArchived on this site by permission of CDCen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAnti-Bacterial Agentsen
dc.subject.meshAntitubercular Agentsen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshDrug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterialen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMicrobial Sensitivity Testsen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshMycobacterium tuberculosisen
dc.subject.meshSputumen
dc.subject.meshTuberculosis, Multidrug-Resistanten
dc.subject.meshTurkmenistanen
dc.subject.meshUzbekistanen
dc.titleMultidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Central Asia.en
dc.contributor.departmentMédecins Sans Frontières Aral Sea Area Programme, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan, Tashkent, Uzbekistan. hom@msfh-tashkent.uzen
dc.identifier.journalEmerging Infectious Diseasesen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T09:12:47Z
html.description.abstractMultidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has emerged as a major threat to TB control, particularly in the former Soviet Union. To determine levels of drug resistance within a directly observed treatment strategy (DOTS) program supported by Médecins Sans Frontières in two regions in Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan, Central Asia, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of smear-positive TB patients in selected districts of Karakalpakstan (Uzbekistan) and Dashoguz (Turkmenistan). High levels of MDR-TB were found in both regions. In Karakalpakstan, 14 (13%) of 106 new patients were infected with MDR-TB; 43 (40%) of 107 previously treated patients were similarly infected. The proportions for Dashoguz were 4% (4/105 patients) and 18% (18/98 patients), respectively. Overall, 27% of patients with positive smear results whose infections were treated through the DOTS program in Karakalpakstan and 11% of similar patients in Dashoguz were infected with multidrug-resistant strains of TB on admission. These results show the need for concerted action by the international community to contain transmission and reduce the effects of MDR-TB.


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