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dc.contributor.authorVeeken, H
dc.contributor.authorRitmeijer, K
dc.contributor.authorHausman, B
dc.date.accessioned2008-02-13T01:18:30Z
dc.date.available2008-02-13T01:18:30Z
dc.date.issued1998
dc.identifier.citationPriority During a Meningitis Epidemic: Vaccination or Treatment? 1998, 76 (2):135-41 Bull. World Health Organ.en
dc.identifier.issn0042-9686
dc.identifier.pmid9648353
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/18132
dc.description.abstractFrom November 1995 to May 1996, a meningitis epidemic occurred in northern Nigeria. More than 75,000 cases and 8440 deaths (case fatality rate (CFR), 11%) were recorded. Médecins sans Frontières, in cooperation with the Nigerian government, carried out an assistance programme (support to case management, surveillance and mass vaccination) in three states (Bauchi, Kano, Katsina) where 75% of cases occurred. Cost analysis of this assistance in Katsina State reveals that case management and mass vaccination were efficient: US$ 35 per case treated and US$ 0.64 per vaccination. There was, however, a remarkable difference in cost-effectiveness between the two strategies. The cost per death averted by improved case treatment was estimated to be US$ 396, while the cost per death averted by vaccination was estimated to be US$ 6000. In large part this difference is attributed to the late start of vaccination: more than 6 weeks after the epidemic threshold had been passed. During meningitis epidemics in countries where surveillance systems are inadequate, such as in most of sub-Saharan Africa, curative programmes should have priority.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPublished by WHO
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.who.int/bulletin/en
dc.rightsArchived on this site with permission of WHOen
dc.subject.meshAnti-Bacterial Agentsen
dc.subject.meshChloramphenicolen
dc.subject.meshCost-Benefit Analysisen
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaksen
dc.subject.meshHealth Prioritiesen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen
dc.subject.meshMeningitis, Meningococcalen
dc.subject.meshNeisseria meningitidisen
dc.subject.meshNigeriaen
dc.subject.meshVaccinationen
dc.titlePriority During a Meningitis Epidemic: Vaccination or Treatment?en
dc.contributor.departmentMedical Department, Médecins sans Frontières-Holland, Amsterdam, Netherlands. hans_veeken@amsterdam.msf.orgen
dc.identifier.journalBulletin of the World Health Organizationen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T09:13:27Z
html.description.abstractFrom November 1995 to May 1996, a meningitis epidemic occurred in northern Nigeria. More than 75,000 cases and 8440 deaths (case fatality rate (CFR), 11%) were recorded. Médecins sans Frontières, in cooperation with the Nigerian government, carried out an assistance programme (support to case management, surveillance and mass vaccination) in three states (Bauchi, Kano, Katsina) where 75% of cases occurred. Cost analysis of this assistance in Katsina State reveals that case management and mass vaccination were efficient: US$ 35 per case treated and US$ 0.64 per vaccination. There was, however, a remarkable difference in cost-effectiveness between the two strategies. The cost per death averted by improved case treatment was estimated to be US$ 396, while the cost per death averted by vaccination was estimated to be US$ 6000. In large part this difference is attributed to the late start of vaccination: more than 6 weeks after the epidemic threshold had been passed. During meningitis epidemics in countries where surveillance systems are inadequate, such as in most of sub-Saharan Africa, curative programmes should have priority.


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