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dc.contributor.authorLacoux, P*
dc.contributor.authorCrombie, I K*
dc.contributor.authorMacrae, W A*
dc.date.accessioned2008-02-14T12:44:33Z
dc.date.available2008-02-14T12:44:33Z
dc.date.issued2002-09
dc.identifier.citationPain in traumatic upper limb amputees in Sierra Leone. 2002, 99 (1-2):309-12 Painen
dc.identifier.issn0304-3959
dc.identifier.pmid12237209
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/18296
dc.description.abstractData on 40 upper limb amputees (11 bilateral) with regard to stump pain, phantom sensation and phantom pain is presented. All the patients lost their limbs as a result of violent injuries intended to terrorise the population and were assessed 10-48 months after the injury. All amputees reported stump pain in the month prior to interview and ten of the 11 bilateral amputees had bilateral pain. Phantom sensation was common (92.5%), but phantom pain was only present in 32.5% of amputees. Problems in translation and explanation may have influenced the low incidence of phantom pain and high incidence of stump pain. In the bilateral amputees phantom sensation, phantom pain and telescoping all showed bilateral concordance, whereas stump pain and neuromas did not show concordance. About half the subjects (56%) had lost their limb at the time of injury (primary) while the remainder had an injury, then a subsequent amputation in hospital (secondary). There was no association between the incidence of phantom pain and amputation irrespective of being primary or secondary.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Painen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAffecten
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAmputation Stumpsen
dc.subject.meshAmputation, Traumaticen
dc.subject.meshArm Injuriesen
dc.subject.meshChronic Diseaseen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshNeuromaen
dc.subject.meshPainen
dc.subject.meshPain Measurementen
dc.subject.meshPhantom Limben
dc.subject.meshSierra Leoneen
dc.subject.meshWaren
dc.titlePain in traumatic upper limb amputees in Sierra Leone.en
dc.contributor.departmentMedecins Sans Frontieres, 8, Rue St Sabin, Paris XI, France.en
dc.identifier.journalPainen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T09:25:01Z
html.description.abstractData on 40 upper limb amputees (11 bilateral) with regard to stump pain, phantom sensation and phantom pain is presented. All the patients lost their limbs as a result of violent injuries intended to terrorise the population and were assessed 10-48 months after the injury. All amputees reported stump pain in the month prior to interview and ten of the 11 bilateral amputees had bilateral pain. Phantom sensation was common (92.5%), but phantom pain was only present in 32.5% of amputees. Problems in translation and explanation may have influenced the low incidence of phantom pain and high incidence of stump pain. In the bilateral amputees phantom sensation, phantom pain and telescoping all showed bilateral concordance, whereas stump pain and neuromas did not show concordance. About half the subjects (56%) had lost their limb at the time of injury (primary) while the remainder had an injury, then a subsequent amputation in hospital (secondary). There was no association between the incidence of phantom pain and amputation irrespective of being primary or secondary.


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