Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGrais, R
dc.contributor.authorde Radiguès, X
dc.contributor.authorDubray, C
dc.contributor.authorFermon, F
dc.contributor.authorGuerin, P J
dc.date.accessioned2008-02-21T15:26:59Z
dc.date.available2008-02-21T15:26:59Z
dc.date.issued2006-08
dc.identifier.citationExploring the Time to Intervene with a Reactive Mass Vaccination Campaign in Measles Epidemics. 2006, 134 (4):845-9 Epidemiol. Infect.
dc.identifier.issn0950-2688
dc.identifier.pmid16438743
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0950268805005716
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/18912
dc.description.abstractThe current WHO policy during measles outbreaks focuses on case management rather than reactive vaccination campaigns in urban areas of resource-poor countries having low vaccine coverage. Vaccination campaigns may be costly, or not timely enough to impact significantly on morbidity and mortality. We explored the time available for intervention during two recent epidemics. Our analysis suggests that the spread of measles in African urban settings may not be as fast as expected. Examining measles epidemic spread in Kinshasa (DRC), and Niamey (Niger) reveals a progression of smaller epidemics. Intervening with a mass campaign or in areas where cases have not yet been reported could slow the epidemic spread. The results of this preliminary analysis illustrate the importance of revisiting outbreak response plans.
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsArchived on this site by kindness of Cambridge University Pressen_GB
dc.subject.meshCongo
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaks
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMass Immunization
dc.subject.meshMeasles
dc.subject.meshMeasles Vaccine
dc.subject.meshNiger
dc.subject.meshPopulation Surveillance
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies
dc.subject.meshTime Factors
dc.titleExploring the Time to Intervene with a Reactive Mass Vaccination Campaign in Measles Epidemics.
dc.contributor.departmentEpicentre, 8 rue Saint Sabin, Paris, France. rebecca.grais@epicentre.msf.org
dc.identifier.journalEpidemiology and Infection
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T09:28:18Z
html.description.abstractThe current WHO policy during measles outbreaks focuses on case management rather than reactive vaccination campaigns in urban areas of resource-poor countries having low vaccine coverage. Vaccination campaigns may be costly, or not timely enough to impact significantly on morbidity and mortality. We explored the time available for intervention during two recent epidemics. Our analysis suggests that the spread of measles in African urban settings may not be as fast as expected. Examining measles epidemic spread in Kinshasa (DRC), and Niamey (Niger) reveals a progression of smaller epidemics. Intervening with a mass campaign or in areas where cases have not yet been reported could slow the epidemic spread. The results of this preliminary analysis illustrate the importance of revisiting outbreak response plans.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
grais.pdf
Size:
114.1Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record