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dc.contributor.authorColebunders, R
dc.contributor.authorSleurs, H
dc.contributor.authorPirard, P
dc.contributor.authorBorchert, M
dc.contributor.authorLibande, M
dc.contributor.authorMustin, J P
dc.contributor.authorTshomba, A
dc.contributor.authorKinuani, L
dc.contributor.authorOlinda, L A
dc.contributor.authorTshioko, F
dc.contributor.authorMuyembe-Tamfum, J J
dc.date.accessioned2008-02-28T10:58:05Z
dc.date.available2008-02-28T10:58:05Z
dc.date.issued2004-05
dc.identifier.citationOrganisation of Health Care During an Outbreak of Marburg Haemorrhagic Fever in the Democratic Republic of Congo, 1999. 2004, 48 (4):347-53 J. Infect.en
dc.identifier.issn0163-4453
dc.identifier.pmid15066337
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0163-4453(03)00122-1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/19293
dc.description.abstractOrganising health care was one of the tasks of the International Scientific and Technical Committee during the 1998-1999 outbreak in Durba/Watsa, in the north-eastern province (Province Orientale), Democratic Republic of Congo. With the logistical support of Médecins sans Frontières (MSF), two isolation units were created: one at the Durba Reference Health Centre and the other at the Okimo Hospital in Watsa. Between May 6th, the day the isolation unit was installed and May 19th, 15 patients were admitted to the Durba Health Centre. In only four of them were the diagnosis of Marburg haemorrhagic fever (MHF) confirmed by laboratory examination. Protective equipment was distributed to health care workers and family members caring for patients. Information about MHF, modes of transmission and the use of barrier nursing techniques was provided to health care workers and sterilisation procedures were reviewed. In contrast to Ebola outbreaks, there was little panic among health care workers and the general public in Durba and all health services remained operational.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/01634453
dc.rightsArchived on this site by kind permission and copyright of 2004 by Elsevieren
dc.subject.meshDelivery of Health Careen
dc.subject.meshDemocratic Republic of the Congoen
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaksen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMarburg Virus Diseaseen
dc.subject.meshMarburgvirusen
dc.subject.meshPatient Isolationen
dc.titleOrganisation of Health Care During an Outbreak of Marburg Haemorrhagic Fever in the Democratic Republic of Congo, 1999.en
dc.contributor.departmentMédecins sans Frontières, Dupréstraat 94, B-1090 Brussel, Belgium. bcoleb@itg.been
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of Infectionen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T09:29:11Z
html.description.abstractOrganising health care was one of the tasks of the International Scientific and Technical Committee during the 1998-1999 outbreak in Durba/Watsa, in the north-eastern province (Province Orientale), Democratic Republic of Congo. With the logistical support of Médecins sans Frontières (MSF), two isolation units were created: one at the Durba Reference Health Centre and the other at the Okimo Hospital in Watsa. Between May 6th, the day the isolation unit was installed and May 19th, 15 patients were admitted to the Durba Health Centre. In only four of them were the diagnosis of Marburg haemorrhagic fever (MHF) confirmed by laboratory examination. Protective equipment was distributed to health care workers and family members caring for patients. Information about MHF, modes of transmission and the use of barrier nursing techniques was provided to health care workers and sterilisation procedures were reviewed. In contrast to Ebola outbreaks, there was little panic among health care workers and the general public in Durba and all health services remained operational.


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