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dc.contributor.authorTong, J
dc.contributor.authorValverde, O
dc.contributor.authorMahoudeau, C
dc.contributor.authorYun, O
dc.contributor.authorChappuis, F
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-07T02:44:00Z
dc.date.available2012-03-07T02:44:00Z
dc.date.issued2011-05-26
dc.identifier.citationChallenges of controlling sleeping sickness in areas of violent conflict: experience in the Democratic Republic of Congo. 2011, 5:7 Confl Healthen
dc.identifier.issn1752-1505
dc.identifier.pmid21615932
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1752-1505-5-7
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/214529
dc.description.abstractHuman African trypanosomiasis (HAT), or sleeping sickness, is a fatal neglected tropical disease if left untreated. HAT primarily affects people living in rural sub-Saharan Africa, often in regions afflicted by violent conflict. Screening and treatment of HAT is complex and resource-intensive, and especially difficult in insecure, resource-constrained settings. The country with the highest endemicity of HAT is the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), which has a number of foci of high disease prevalence. We present here the challenges of carrying out HAT control programmes in general and in a conflict-affected region of DRC. We discuss the difficulties of measuring disease burden, medical care complexities, waning international support, and research and development barriers for HAT.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.conflictandhealth.com/content/5/1/7en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Conflict and Healthen
dc.subject.meshTrypanosomiasis, Africanen
dc.titleChallenges of controlling sleeping sickness in areas of violent conflict: experience in the Democratic Republic of Congo.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMédecins Sans Frontières, Rue de Lausanne 78, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland. jacquitong@yahoo.co.uk.en
dc.identifier.journalConflict and Healthen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T09:42:10Z
html.description.abstractHuman African trypanosomiasis (HAT), or sleeping sickness, is a fatal neglected tropical disease if left untreated. HAT primarily affects people living in rural sub-Saharan Africa, often in regions afflicted by violent conflict. Screening and treatment of HAT is complex and resource-intensive, and especially difficult in insecure, resource-constrained settings. The country with the highest endemicity of HAT is the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), which has a number of foci of high disease prevalence. We present here the challenges of carrying out HAT control programmes in general and in a conflict-affected region of DRC. We discuss the difficulties of measuring disease burden, medical care complexities, waning international support, and research and development barriers for HAT.


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