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dc.contributor.authorMakombe, S D
dc.contributor.authorJahn, A
dc.contributor.authorTweya, H
dc.contributor.authorChuka, S
dc.contributor.authorYu, J K L
dc.contributor.authorHochgesang, M
dc.contributor.authorAberle-Grasse, J
dc.contributor.authorPasulani, O
dc.contributor.authorSchouten, E J
dc.contributor.authorKamoto, K
dc.contributor.authorHarries, A D
dc.date.accessioned2008-04-10T15:52:50Z
dc.date.available2008-04-10T15:52:50Z
dc.date.issued2007-11
dc.identifier.citationA national survey of the impact of rapid scale-up of antiretroviral therapy on health-care workers in Malawi: effects on human resources and survival. 2007, 85 (11):851-7 Bull. World Health Organ.en
dc.identifier.issn0042-9686
dc.identifier.pmid18038075
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/22935
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To assess the human resources impact of Malawis rapidly growing antiretroviral therapy (ART) programme and balance this against the survival benefit of health-care workers who have accessed ART themselves. METHODS: We conducted a national cross-sectional survey of the human resource allocation in all public-sector health facilities providing ART in mid-2006. We also undertook a survival analysis of health-care workers who had accessed ART in public and private facilities by 30 June 2006, using data from the national ART monitoring and evaluation system. FINDINGS: By 30 June 2006, 59 581 patients had accessed ART from 95 public and 28 private facilities. The public sites provided ART services on 2.4 days per week on average, requiring 7% of the clinician workforce, 3% of the nursing workforce and 24% of the ward clerk workforce available at the facilities. We identified 1024 health-care workers in the national ART-patient cohort (2% of all ART patients). The probabilities for survival on ART at 6 months, 12 months and 18 months were 85%, 81% and 78%, respectively. An estimated 250 health-care workers lives were saved 12 months after ART initiation. Their combined work-time of more than 1000 staff-days per week was equivalent to the human resources required to provide ART at the national level. CONCLUSION: A large number of ART patients in Malawi are managed by a small proportion of the health-care workforce. Many health-care workers have accessed ART with good treatment outcomes. Currently, staffing required for ART balances against health-care workers lives saved through treatment, although this may change in the future.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWHOen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to the World Health Organizationen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAnti-HIV Agentsen
dc.subject.meshCD4 Lymphocyte Counten
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHIV Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshHealth Care Rationingen
dc.subject.meshHealth Personnelen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMalawien
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshSurvival Analysisen
dc.titleA national survey of the impact of rapid scale-up of antiretroviral therapy on health-care workers in Malawi: effects on human resources and survival.en
dc.contributor.departmentHIV Unit, Ministry of Health, Lilongwe, Malawi.en
dc.identifier.journalBulletin of the World Health Organizationen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T09:51:28Z
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To assess the human resources impact of Malawis rapidly growing antiretroviral therapy (ART) programme and balance this against the survival benefit of health-care workers who have accessed ART themselves. METHODS: We conducted a national cross-sectional survey of the human resource allocation in all public-sector health facilities providing ART in mid-2006. We also undertook a survival analysis of health-care workers who had accessed ART in public and private facilities by 30 June 2006, using data from the national ART monitoring and evaluation system. FINDINGS: By 30 June 2006, 59 581 patients had accessed ART from 95 public and 28 private facilities. The public sites provided ART services on 2.4 days per week on average, requiring 7% of the clinician workforce, 3% of the nursing workforce and 24% of the ward clerk workforce available at the facilities. We identified 1024 health-care workers in the national ART-patient cohort (2% of all ART patients). The probabilities for survival on ART at 6 months, 12 months and 18 months were 85%, 81% and 78%, respectively. An estimated 250 health-care workers lives were saved 12 months after ART initiation. Their combined work-time of more than 1000 staff-days per week was equivalent to the human resources required to provide ART at the national level. CONCLUSION: A large number of ART patients in Malawi are managed by a small proportion of the health-care workforce. Many health-care workers have accessed ART with good treatment outcomes. Currently, staffing required for ART balances against health-care workers lives saved through treatment, although this may change in the future.


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