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dc.contributor.authorMeade, P
dc.contributor.authorMirocha, J
dc.date.accessioned2008-04-14T11:20:51Z
dc.date.available2008-04-14T11:20:51Z
dc.date.issued2000-04
dc.identifier.citationCivilian Landmine Injuries in Sri Lanka. 2000, 48 (4):735-9notJ Traumaen
dc.identifier.issn0022-5282
dc.identifier.pmid10780610
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/23219
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to describe the injuries sustained by displaced people returning home after a military conflict when landmines were not removed. METHOD: This study describes the landmine injuries to patients at the Jaffna Teaching Hospital in northern Sri Lanka over a 20-month period, from May 1, 1996, to December 31, 1997. RESULTS: There were definite and identifiable landmine injury patterns. Patients were most often wounded in the lower extremities, had multiple wounds, and were injured together in groups. Victims were most often male, but there were unusually high numbers of women, children, and elderly injured. Mortality rates and amputation rates were high. Deaths occurred early after injury. Higher incidences of mine injuries could be associated with two important activities: returning home and agriculture. CONCLUSIONS: Civilians returning home after armed conflicts are at risk of injury when landmines are not removed. No one is spared. This problem is preventable.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsPublished by Wolters Kluwer Lippincott Williams & Wilkins - Archived on this site by kind permission Wolters Kluweren
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshAmputationen
dc.subject.meshBlast Injuriesen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshLength of Stayen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshMultiple Traumaen
dc.subject.meshSeasonsen
dc.subject.meshSri Lankaen
dc.subject.meshWaren
dc.titleCivilian Landmine Injuries in Sri Lanka.en
dc.contributor.departmentMedecins Sans Frontieres/Doctors Without Borders, Department of Surgery, King Drew Medical Center, Los Angeles, California 90059, USA.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Traumaen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T09:52:55Z
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to describe the injuries sustained by displaced people returning home after a military conflict when landmines were not removed. METHOD: This study describes the landmine injuries to patients at the Jaffna Teaching Hospital in northern Sri Lanka over a 20-month period, from May 1, 1996, to December 31, 1997. RESULTS: There were definite and identifiable landmine injury patterns. Patients were most often wounded in the lower extremities, had multiple wounds, and were injured together in groups. Victims were most often male, but there were unusually high numbers of women, children, and elderly injured. Mortality rates and amputation rates were high. Deaths occurred early after injury. Higher incidences of mine injuries could be associated with two important activities: returning home and agriculture. CONCLUSIONS: Civilians returning home after armed conflicts are at risk of injury when landmines are not removed. No one is spared. This problem is preventable.


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