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dc.contributor.authorMinetti, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorKagoli, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorKatsulukuta, Agnes
dc.contributor.authorHuerga, Helena
dc.contributor.authorFeatherstone, Amber
dc.contributor.authorChiotcha, Hazel
dc.contributor.authorNoel, Delphine
dc.contributor.authorBopp, Cameron
dc.contributor.authorSury, Laurent
dc.contributor.authorFricke, Renzo
dc.contributor.authorIscla, Marta
dc.contributor.authorHurtado, Northan
dc.contributor.authorDucomble, Tanya
dc.contributor.authorNicholas, Sarala
dc.contributor.authorKabuluzi, Storn
dc.contributor.authorGrais, Rebecca F
dc.contributor.authorLuquero, Francisco J
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-28T23:42:16Z
dc.date.available2013-02-28T23:42:16Z
dc.date.issued2013-02-01
dc.identifier.citationEmerging Infect. Dis. 2013;19(2):202-9en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1080-6059
dc.identifier.pmid23343504
dc.identifier.doi10.3201/eid1902.120301
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/270740
dc.description.abstractDespite high reported coverage for routine and supplementary immunization, in 2010 in Malawi, a large measles outbreak occurred that comprised 134,000 cases and 304 deaths. Although the highest attack rates were for young children (2.3%, 7.6%, and 4.5% for children <6, 6-8, and 9-11 months, respectively), persons >15 years of age were highly affected (1.0% and 0.4% for persons 15-19 and >19 years, respectively; 28% of all cases). A survey in 8 districts showed routine coverage of 95.0% for children 12-23 months; 57.9% for children 9-11 months; and 60.7% for children covered during the last supplementary immunization activities in 2008. Vaccine effectiveness was 83.9% for 1 dose and 90.5% for 2 doses. A continuous accumulation of susceptible persons during the past decade probably accounts for this outbreak. Countries en route to measles elimination, such as Malawi, should improve outbreak preparedness. Timeliness and the population chosen are crucial elements for reactive campaigns.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCenter for Disease Control and Preventionen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/19/2/12-0301_article.htmen_GB
dc.rightsPublished by Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Archived on this site by permission of CDC, http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/eiden_GB
dc.titleLessons and challenges for measles control from unexpected large outbreak, Malawien
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentEpicentre, Paris, France; Ministry of Health, Lilongwe, Malawi; Médecins Sans Frontières, Lilongwe; Médecins Sans Frontières, Paris, France; Médecins Sans Frontières, Brussels, Belgium; Médecins Sans Frontières, Barcelona, Spain.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalEmerging infectious diseasesen_GB
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T10:16:34Z
html.description.abstractDespite high reported coverage for routine and supplementary immunization, in 2010 in Malawi, a large measles outbreak occurred that comprised 134,000 cases and 304 deaths. Although the highest attack rates were for young children (2.3%, 7.6%, and 4.5% for children <6, 6-8, and 9-11 months, respectively), persons >15 years of age were highly affected (1.0% and 0.4% for persons 15-19 and >19 years, respectively; 28% of all cases). A survey in 8 districts showed routine coverage of 95.0% for children 12-23 months; 57.9% for children 9-11 months; and 60.7% for children covered during the last supplementary immunization activities in 2008. Vaccine effectiveness was 83.9% for 1 dose and 90.5% for 2 doses. A continuous accumulation of susceptible persons during the past decade probably accounts for this outbreak. Countries en route to measles elimination, such as Malawi, should improve outbreak preparedness. Timeliness and the population chosen are crucial elements for reactive campaigns.


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