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dc.contributor.authorCalain, Philippe
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-04T20:13:12Z
dc.date.available2013-10-04T20:13:12Z
dc.date.issued2011-12-30
dc.date.submitted2013-06-20
dc.identifier.citationIn Search of the 'New Informal Legitimacy' of Médecins Sans Frontières. 2012, 5 (1):56-66 Public Health Ethicsen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1754-9973
dc.identifier.pmid22442647
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/phe/phr036
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/302764
dc.descriptionTo access this article, click on "Additional Links"
dc.description.abstractFor medical humanitarian organizations, making their sources of legitimacy explicit is a useful exercise, in response to: misperceptions, concerns over the 'humanitarian space', controversies about specific humanitarian actions, challenges about resources allocation and moral suffering among humanitarian workers. This is also a difficult exercise, where normative criteria such as international law or humanitarian principles are often misrepresented as primary sources of legitimacy. This essay first argues for a morally principled definition of humanitarian medicine, based on the selfless intention of individual humanitarian actors. Taking Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) as a case in point, a common source of moral legitimacy for medical humanitarian organizations is their cosmopolitan appeal to distributive justice and collective responsibility. More informally, their legitimacy is grounded in the rightfulness of specific actions and choices. This implies a constant commitment to publicity and accountability. Legitimacy is also generated by tangible support from the public to individual organizations, by commitments to professional integrity, and by academic alliances to support evidence-based practice and operational research.
dc.languageENG
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://cid.oxfordjournals.org//cgi/reprint/57/9/1351?ijkey=56xNTA/HM44tA&keytype=ref&siteid=cid
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Oxford University Press and Public Health Ethicsen_GB
dc.subjectOtheren_GB
dc.titleIn search of the 'new informal legitimacy' of Médecins Sans Frontièresen
dc.contributor.departmentUnité de Recherche sur les Enjeux et Pratiques Humanitaires (UREPH), Médecins Sans Frontières-Switzerlanden_GB
dc.identifier.journalPublic Health Ethicsen_GB
html.description.abstractFor medical humanitarian organizations, making their sources of legitimacy explicit is a useful exercise, in response to: misperceptions, concerns over the 'humanitarian space', controversies about specific humanitarian actions, challenges about resources allocation and moral suffering among humanitarian workers. This is also a difficult exercise, where normative criteria such as international law or humanitarian principles are often misrepresented as primary sources of legitimacy. This essay first argues for a morally principled definition of humanitarian medicine, based on the selfless intention of individual humanitarian actors. Taking Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) as a case in point, a common source of moral legitimacy for medical humanitarian organizations is their cosmopolitan appeal to distributive justice and collective responsibility. More informally, their legitimacy is grounded in the rightfulness of specific actions and choices. This implies a constant commitment to publicity and accountability. Legitimacy is also generated by tangible support from the public to individual organizations, by commitments to professional integrity, and by academic alliances to support evidence-based practice and operational research.


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