• The Burden of Road Traffic Injuries in an Emergency Department in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

      Getachew, S; Ali, E; Tayler-Smith, K; Hedt-Gauthier, B; Silkondez, W; Abebe, D; Deressa, W; Enquessilase, F; Edwards, J K (International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2016-06-21)
      The emergency department (ED) of Zewditu Memorial Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    • Closing the gap: decentralising mental health care to primary care centres in one rural district of Rwanda

      Nyirandagijimana, B; Edwards, JK; Venables, E; Ali, E; Rusangwa, C; Mukasakindi, H; Borg, R; Fabien, M; Tharcisse, M; Nshimyiryo, A; Park, PH; Raviola, GJ; Smith, SL (International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2017-09-21)
      Setting: Programmes that integrate mental health care into primary care settings could reduce the global burden of mental disorders by increasing treatment availability in resource-limited settings, including Rwanda. Objective: We describe patient demographics, service use and retention of patients in care at health centres (HC) participating in an innovative primary care integration programme, compared to patients using existing district hospital-based specialised out-patient care. Design: This was a retrospective cohort study using routinely collected data from six health centres and one district hospital from October 2014 to March 2015. Results: Of 709 patients, 607 were cared for at HCs; HCs accounted for 88% of the total visits for mental disorders. Patients with psychosis used HC services more frequently, while patients with affective disorders were seen more frequently at the district hospital. Of the 68% of patients who returned to care within 90 days of their first visit, 76% had a third visit within a further 90 days. There were no significant differences in follow-up rates between clinical settings. Conclusion: This study suggests that a programme of mentorship for primary care nurses can facilitate the decentralisation of out-patient mental health care from specialised district hospital mental health services to HCs in rural Rwanda.
    • Conflict and tuberculosis in Sudan: a 10-year review of the National Tuberculosis Programme, 2004-2014.

      Hassanain, SA; Edwards, JK; Venables, E; Ali, E; Adam, K; Hussien, H; Elsony, A (BioMed Central, 2018-05-16)
      Sudan is a fragile developing country, with a low expenditure on health. It has been subjected to ongoing conflicts ever since 1956, with the Darfur crisis peaking in 2004. The conflict, in combination with the weak infrastructure, can lead to poor access to healthcare. Hence, this can cause an increased risk of infection, greater morbidity and mortality from tuberculosis (TB), especially amongst the poor, displaced and refugee populations. This study will be the first to describe TB case notifications, characteristics and outcomes over a ten-year period in Darfur in comparison with the non-conflict Eastern zones within Sudan.
    • Early Physical and Functional Rehabilitation of Trauma Patients in the Médecins Sans Frontières Trauma Centre in Kunduz, Afghanistan: Luxury or Necessity?

      Gohy, B; Ali, E; Van den Bergh, R; Schillberg, E; Nasim, M; Naimi, MM; Cheréstal, S; Falipou, P; Weerts, E; Skelton, P; Van Overloop, C; Trelles, M (Oxford University Press, 2016-10-13)
      In Afghanistan, Médecins Sans Frontières provided specialised trauma care in Kunduz Trauma Centre (KTC), including physiotherapy. In this study, we describe the development of an adapted functional score for patient outcome monitoring, and document the rehabilitation care provided and patient outcomes in relation to this functional score.
    • Factors Associated with Unfavorable Treatment Outcomes in New and Previously Treated TB Patients in Uzbekistan: A Five Year Countrywide Study

      Gadoev, J; Asadov, D; Tillashaykhov, M; Tayler-Smith, K; Isaakidis, P; Dadu, A; Colombani, P d; Gudmund Hinderaker, S; Parpieva, N; Ulmasova, D; Jalolov, A; Hamraev, A; Ali, E; Boom, M v d; Hammerich, A; Gozalov, O; Dara, M (Public Library of Science, 2015-06-15)
      TB is one of the main health priorities in Uzbekistan and relatively high rates of unfavorable treatment outcomes have recently been reported. This requires closer analysis to explain the reasons and recommend interventions to improve the situation. Thus, by using countrywide data this study sought to determine trends in unfavorable outcomes (lost-to-follow-ups, deaths and treatment failures) and describe their associations with socio-demographic and clinical factors.
    • How effective is the integration of facility and community-based management of severe acute malnutrition in India?

      Kumar, B; Shrivastava, J; Satyanarayana, S; Reid, A J; Ali, E; Zodpey, S; Agnani, M (2013-12-21)
    • Managing and Monitoring Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases in a Primary Health Care Clinic, Lilongwe, Malawi

      Manjomo, R C; Mwagomba, B; Ade, S; Ali, E; Ben-Smith, A; Khomani, P; Bondwe, P; Nkhoma, D; Douglas, G P; Tayler-Smith, K; Chikosi, L; Harries, A D; Gadabu, O J (International Union Against TB and Lung Disease, 2016-06-21)
      Setting: Patients with chronic non-communicable diseases attending a primary health care centre, Lilongwe, Malawi. Objective: Using an electronic medical record monitoring system, to describe the quarterly and cumulative disease burden, management and outcomes of patients registered between March 2014 and June 2015. Design: A cross-sectional study. Results: Of 1135 patients, with new registrations increasing each quarter, 66% were female, 21% were aged 65 years, 20% were obese, 53% had hypertension alone, 18% had diabetes alone, 12% had asthma, 10% had epilepsy and 7% had both hypertension and diabetes. In every quarter, about 30% of patients did not attend the clinic and 19% were registered as lost to follow-up (not seen for 1 year) in the last quarter. Of those attending, over 90% were prescribed medication, and 80–90% with hypertension and/or diabetes had blood pressure/blood glucose measured. Over 85% of those with epilepsy had no seizures and 60–75% with asthma had no severe attacks. Control of blood pressure (41–51%) and diabetes (15–38%) was poor. Conclusion: It is feasible to manage patients with non-communicable diseases in a primary health care setting in Malawi, although more attention is needed to improve clinic attendance and the control of hypertension and diabetes.
    • Managing and Monitoring Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases in a Primary Health Care Clinic, Lilongwe, Malawi

      Manjomo, RC; Mwagomba, B; Ade, S; Ali, E; Ben-Smith, A; Khomani, P; Bondwe, P; Nkhoma, D; Douglas, GP; Tayler-Smith, K; Chikosi, L; Harries, A D; Gadabu, O J (International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2016-06-21)
      Patients with chronic non-communicable diseases attending a primary health care centre, Lilongwe, Malawi.
    • Open access for operational research publications from low- and middle-income countries: who pays?

      Zachariah, R; Kumar, A M V; Reid, A J; Van den Bergh, R; Isaakidis, P; Draguez, B; Delaunois, P; Nagaraja, S B; Ramsay, A; Reeder, J C; Denisiuk, O; Ali, E; Khogali, M; Hinderaker, S G; Kosgei, R J; van Griensven, J; Quaglio, G L; Maher, D; Billo, N E; Terry, R F; Harries, A D (International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2014-09-21)
    • Recurrent Tuberculosis and Associated Factors: A Five - Year Countrywide Study in Uzbekistan

      Gadoev, J; Asadov, D; Harries, AD; Parpieva, N; Tayler-Smith, K; Isaakidis, P; Ali, E; Hinderaker, SG; Ogtay, G; Ramsay, A; Jalolov, A; Dara, M (Public Library of Science, 2017-05-04)
      In Uzbekistan, despite stable and relatively high tuberculosis treatment success rates, relatively high rates of recurrent tuberculosis have recently been reported. Recurrent tuberculosis is when a patient who was treated for pulmonary tuberculosis and cured, later develops the disease again. This requires closer analysis to identify possible causes and recommend interventions to improve the situation. Using countrywide data, this study aimed to analyse trends in recurrent tuberculosis cases and describe their associations with socio-demographic and clinical factors.
    • The Structured Operational Research and Training Initiative for public health programmes

      Ramsay, A; Harries, A D; Zachariah, R; Bissel, K; Hinderaker, S G; Edginton, M; Enarson, D A; Satyanarayana, S; Kumar, A M V; Hoa, N B; Tweya, H; Reid, A J; Van den Bergh, R; Tayler-Smith, K; Manzi, M; Khogali, M; Kizito, W; Ali, E; Delaunois, P; Reeder, J C (The Union, 2014-06-21)