• Body and mind: retention in antiretroviral treatment care is improved by mental health training of care providers in Ethiopia

      Berheto, TM; Hinderaker, SG; Senkoro, M; Tweya, H; Deressa, T; Getaneh, Y; Gezahegn, G (BioMed Central, 2018-07-20)
      Ethiopia has achieved a high coverage of antiretroviral treatment (ART), but maintaining lifelong care is still a great challenge. Mental illnesses often co-exist with HIV/AIDS and may compromise the retention on ART. In order to improve prolonged retention in ART care, basic training in mental health care was introduced for ART providers, but this hasn't been evaluated yet. The aim of this study was to examine if this training has improved patient retention in care.
    • Childhood tuberculosis in Mauritania, 2010-2015: diagnosis and outcomes in Nouakchott and the rest of the country

      Aw, B; Ade, S; Hinderaker, SG; Dlamini, N; Takarinda, KC; Chiaa, K; Feil, A; Traoré, A; Reid, T (International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2017-09-21)
      Setting: The National Tuberculosis Programme, Mauritania. Objective: To compare the diagnosis and treatment outcomes of childhood tuberculosis (TB) cases (aged <15 years) registered between 2010 and 2015 inside and outside Nouakchott, the capital city. Design: This was a retrospective comparative cohort study. Results: A total of 948 children with TB were registered. The registration rate was 10 times higher in Nouakchott. The proportion of children among all TB cases was higher inside than outside Nouakchott (7.5% vs. 4.6%, P < 0.01). Under-fives represented 225 (24%) of all childhood TB cases, of whom 204 (91%) were registered in Nouakchott. Extra-pulmonary TB was more common in Nouakchott, while smear-negative TB was less common. Treatment success was similar inside and outside Nouakchott (national rate 61%). The principal unsuccessful outcomes were loss to follow-up outside Nouakchott (21% vs. 11%, P < 0.01) while transfers out were more common in the city (25% vs. 14%, P = 0.01). Being aged <5 years (OR 1.2, 95%CI 1.1-1.5) was associated with an unsuccessful outcome. Conclusion: This study indicates problems in the diagnosis and treatment of childhood TB in Mauritania, especially outside the city of Nouakchott. We suggest strengthening clinical diagnosis and management, improving communications between TB treatment centres and health services and pressing the TB world to develop more accurate and easy-to-use diagnostic tools for children.
    • Recurrent Tuberculosis and Associated Factors: A Five - Year Countrywide Study in Uzbekistan

      Gadoev, J; Asadov, D; Harries, AD; Parpieva, N; Tayler-Smith, K; Isaakidis, P; Ali, E; Hinderaker, SG; Ogtay, G; Ramsay, A; et al. (Public Library of Science, 2017-05-04)
      In Uzbekistan, despite stable and relatively high tuberculosis treatment success rates, relatively high rates of recurrent tuberculosis have recently been reported. Recurrent tuberculosis is when a patient who was treated for pulmonary tuberculosis and cured, later develops the disease again. This requires closer analysis to identify possible causes and recommend interventions to improve the situation. Using countrywide data, this study aimed to analyse trends in recurrent tuberculosis cases and describe their associations with socio-demographic and clinical factors.