• Advances in malaria elimination in Botswana: a dramatic shift to parasitological diagnosis, 2008-2014

      Moakofhi, K; Edwards, JK; Motlaleng, M; Namboze, J; Butt, W; Obopile, M; Mosweunyane, T; Manzi, M; Takarinda, KC; Owiti, P (International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2018-04-25)
      Background: Malaria elimination requires infection detection using quality assured diagnostics and appropriate treatment regimens. Although Botswana is moving towards malaria elimination, reports of unconfirmed cases may jeopardise this effort. This study aimed to determine the proportion of cases treated for malaria that were confirmed by rapid diagnostic testing (RDT) and/or microscopy. Methods: This was a retrospective descriptive study using routine national data from the integrated disease surveillance and case-based surveillance systems from 2008 to 2014. The data were categorised into clinical and confirmed cases each year. An analysis of the data on cases registered in three districts that reported approximately 70% of all malaria cases was performed, stratified by year, type of reporting health facilities and diagnostic method. Results: During 2008-2014, 50 487 cases of malaria were reported in Botswana, and the proportion of RDT and/or blood microscopy confirmed cases improved from 6% in 2008 to 89% in 2013. The total number of malaria cases decreased by 97% in the same period, then increased by 41% in 2013. Conclusion: This study shows that malaria diagnostic tests dramatically improved malaria diagnosis and consequently reduced the malaria burden in Botswana. The study identified a need to build capacity on microscopy for species identification, parasite quantification and guiding treatment choices.
    • Case management of malaria in Swaziland, 2011-2015: on track for elimination?

      Dlamini, SV; Kosgei, RJ; Mkhonta, N; Zulu, Z; Makadzange, K; Zhou, S; Owiti, P; Sikhondze, W; Namboze, J; Reid, A; et al. (International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2018-04-25)
      Objective: To assess adherence to malaria diagnosis and treatment guidelines (2010 and 2014) in all health care facilities in Swaziland between 2011 and 2015. Methods: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study involving all health care facilities that diagnosed and managed malaria cases in Swaziland. Patients' age, sex, diagnosis method and type of treatment were analysed. Results: Of 1981 records for severe and uncomplicated malaria analysed, 56% of cases were uncomplicated and 14% had severe malaria. The type of malaria was not recorded for 30% of cases. Approximately 71% of cases were confirmed by rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) alone, 3% by microscopy alone and 26% by both RDT and microscopy. Of the uncomplicated cases, 93% were treated with artemether-lumefantrine (AL) alone, 5% with quinine alone and 2% with AL and quinine. Amongst the severe cases, 11% were treated with AL alone, 44% with quinine alone and 45% with AL and quinine. For severe malaria, clinics and health centres prescribed AL alone more often than hospitals (respectively 13%, 12% and 4%, P = 0.03). Conclusion: RDTs and/or microscopy results are used at all facilities to inform treatment. Poor recording of malaria type causes difficulties in assessing the prescription of antimalarial drugs.
    • Changing distribution and abundance of the malaria vector Anopheles merus in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa

      Mbokazi, F; Coetzee, M; Brooke, B; Govere, J; Reid, A; Owiti, P; Kosgei, R; Zhou, S; Magagula, R; Kok, G; et al. (International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2018-04-25)
      Background: The malaria vector Anopheles merus occurs in the Mpumalanga Province of South Africa. As its contribution to malaria transmission in South Africa has yet to be ascertained, an intensification of surveillance is necessary to provide baseline information on this species. The aim of this study was therefore to map An. merus breeding sites in the Ehlanzeni District of Mpumalanga Province and to assess qualitative trends in the distribution and relative abundance of this species over a 9-year period. Methods: The study was carried out during the period 2005-2014 in the four high-risk municipalities of Ehlanzeni District. Fifty-two breeding sites were chosen from all water bodies that produced anopheline mosquitoes. The study data were extracted from historical entomological records that are captured monthly. Results: Of the 15 058 Anopheles mosquitoes collected, 64% were An. merus. The abundance and distribution of An. merus increased throughout the four municipalities in Ehlanzeni District during the study period. Conclusion: The expanded distribution and increased abundance of An. merus in the Ehlanzeni District may contribute significantly to locally acquired malaria in Mpumalanga Province, likely necessitating the incorporation of additional vector control methods specifically directed against populations of this species.
    • Did microbial larviciding contribute to a reduction in malaria cases in eastern Botswana in 2012-2013?

      Obopile, M; Segoea, G; Waniwa, K; Ntebela, DS; Moakofhi, K; Motlaleng, M; Mosweunyane, T; Edwards, JK; Namboze, J; Butt, W; et al. (International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2018-04-25)
      Setting: Larviciding has potential as a component of integrated vector management for the reduction of malaria transmission in Botswana by complementing long-lasting insecticide nets and indoor residual sprays. Objective: To evaluate the susceptibility of local Anopheles to commonly used larvicides. Design: This field test of the efficacy of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israliensis vs. Anopheles was performed by measuring larval density before treatment and 24 h and 48 h after treatment in seven sites of Bobirwa district, eastern Botswana, in 2012 and 2013. Vector density and malaria cases were compared between Bobirwa and Ngami (northwestern Botswana), with no larviciding in the control arm. Results: Larviciding reduced larval density by 95% in Bobirwa in 2012, with two cases of malaria, while in 2013 larval density reduction was 81%, with 11 cases. Adult mosquito density was zero for both years in Robelela village (Bobirwa), compared to respectively four and 26 adult mosquitoes per room in Shorobe village (Ngami) in 2012 and 2013. There were no cases of malaria in Robelela in either year, but in Shorobe there were 20 and 70 cases, respectively, in 2012 and 2013. Conclusion: Larviciding can reduce the larval density of mosquitoes and reduce malaria transmission in Botswana. Large-scale, targeted implementation of larviciding in districts at high risk for malaria is recommended.
    • Driving towards malaria elimination in Botswana by 2018: progress on case-based surveillance, 2013-2014

      Motlaleng, M; Edwards, J; Namboze, J; Butt, W; Moakofhi, K; Obopile, M; Manzi, M; Takarinda, KC; Zachariah, R; Owiti, P; et al. (International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2018-04-25)
      Background: Reliable information reporting systems ensure that all malaria cases are tested, treated and tracked to avoid further transmission. Botswana aimed to eliminate malaria by 2018, and surveillance is key. This study focused on assessing the uptake of the new malaria case-based surveillance (CBS) system introduced in 2012, which captures information on malaria cases reported in the Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR) system. Methods: This was a retrospective descriptive study based on routine data focusing on Ngami, Chobe and Okavango, three high-risk districts in Botswana. Aggregated data variables were extracted from the IDSR and compared with data from the CBS. Results: The IDSR reported 456 malaria cases in 2013 and 1346 in 2014, of which respectively only 305 and 884 were reported by the CBS. The CBS reported 34% fewer cases than the IDSR system, indicating substantial differences between the two systems. The key malaria indicators with the greatest variability among the districts included in the study were case identification number and date of diagnosis. Conclusion: The IDSR and CBS systems are essential for malaria elimination, as shown by the significant gaps in reporting between the two systems. These findings highlight the need for further investigation into these discrepancies. Strengthening the CBS system will help to reach the objective of malaria elimination in Botswana.