• Active Case-Finding for Tuberculosis by Mobile Teams in Myanmar: Yield and Treatment Outcomes

      Myint, O; Saw, S; Isaakidis, P; Khogali, M; Reid, A; Hoa, N; Kyaw, T; Zaw, K; Khaing, T; Aung, S (BioMed Central, 2017-06-02)
      Since 2005, the Myanmar National Tuberculosis Programme (NTP) has been implementing active case finding (ACF) activities involving mobile teams in hard-to-reach areas. This study revealed the contribution of mobile team activities to total tuberculosis (TB) case detection, characteristics of TB patients detected by mobile teams and their treatment outcomes.
    • Case management of malaria in Swaziland, 2011-2015: on track for elimination?

      Dlamini, SV; Kosgei, RJ; Mkhonta, N; Zulu, Z; Makadzange, K; Zhou, S; Owiti, P; Sikhondze, W; Namboze, J; Reid, A; et al. (International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2018-04-25)
      Objective: To assess adherence to malaria diagnosis and treatment guidelines (2010 and 2014) in all health care facilities in Swaziland between 2011 and 2015. Methods: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study involving all health care facilities that diagnosed and managed malaria cases in Swaziland. Patients' age, sex, diagnosis method and type of treatment were analysed. Results: Of 1981 records for severe and uncomplicated malaria analysed, 56% of cases were uncomplicated and 14% had severe malaria. The type of malaria was not recorded for 30% of cases. Approximately 71% of cases were confirmed by rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) alone, 3% by microscopy alone and 26% by both RDT and microscopy. Of the uncomplicated cases, 93% were treated with artemether-lumefantrine (AL) alone, 5% with quinine alone and 2% with AL and quinine. Amongst the severe cases, 11% were treated with AL alone, 44% with quinine alone and 45% with AL and quinine. For severe malaria, clinics and health centres prescribed AL alone more often than hospitals (respectively 13%, 12% and 4%, P = 0.03). Conclusion: RDTs and/or microscopy results are used at all facilities to inform treatment. Poor recording of malaria type causes difficulties in assessing the prescription of antimalarial drugs.
    • Changing distribution and abundance of the malaria vector Anopheles merus in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa

      Mbokazi, F; Coetzee, M; Brooke, B; Govere, J; Reid, A; Owiti, P; Kosgei, R; Zhou, S; Magagula, R; Kok, G; et al. (International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2018-04-25)
      Background: The malaria vector Anopheles merus occurs in the Mpumalanga Province of South Africa. As its contribution to malaria transmission in South Africa has yet to be ascertained, an intensification of surveillance is necessary to provide baseline information on this species. The aim of this study was therefore to map An. merus breeding sites in the Ehlanzeni District of Mpumalanga Province and to assess qualitative trends in the distribution and relative abundance of this species over a 9-year period. Methods: The study was carried out during the period 2005-2014 in the four high-risk municipalities of Ehlanzeni District. Fifty-two breeding sites were chosen from all water bodies that produced anopheline mosquitoes. The study data were extracted from historical entomological records that are captured monthly. Results: Of the 15 058 Anopheles mosquitoes collected, 64% were An. merus. The abundance and distribution of An. merus increased throughout the four municipalities in Ehlanzeni District during the study period. Conclusion: The expanded distribution and increased abundance of An. merus in the Ehlanzeni District may contribute significantly to locally acquired malaria in Mpumalanga Province, likely necessitating the incorporation of additional vector control methods specifically directed against populations of this species.
    • Compliance to follow up and adherence to medication in hypertensive patients in an urban informal settlement in Kenya: comparison of three models of care

      Kuria, N; Reid, A; Owiti, P; Tweya, H; Kibet, CK; Mbau, L; Manzi, M; Murunga, V; Namusonge, T; Kibachio, J (Wiley-Blackwell, 2018-05-19)
      To determine and compare, among three models of care, compliance to scheduled clinic appointments and adherence to anti-hypertensive medication of patients in an informal settlement of Kibera, Kenya.
    • Different Challenges, Different Approaches and Related Expenditures of Community-Based Tuberculosis Activities by International Non-Governmental Organizations in Myanmar

      Han, WW; Saw, S; Isaakidis, P; Khogali, M; Reid, A; Hoa, N; Zaw, KK; Aung, ST (BioMed Central, 2017-03-24)
      International non-governmental organizations (INGOs) have been implementing community-based tuberculosis (TB) care (CBTBC) in Myanmar since 2011. Although the National TB Programme (NTP) ultimately plans to take over CBTBC, there have been no evaluations of the models of care or of the costs of providing CBTBC in Myanmar by INGOs.
    • Does the Structured Operational Research and Training Initiative (SORT IT) continue to influence health policy and/or practice?

      Tripathy, JP; Kumar, AM; Guillerm, N; Berger, SD; Bissell, K; Reid, A; Zachariah, R; Ramsay, A; Harries, AD (Taylor & Francis, 2018-08-01)
      The Structured Operational Research and Training Initiative (SORT IT) is a successful model of integrated operational research and capacity building with about 90% of participants completing the training and publishing in scientific journals.
    • Hidden dangers-prevalence of blood borne pathogens, hepatitis B, C, HIV and syphilis, among blood donors in Sierra Leone in 2016: opportunities for improvement: a retrospective, cross-sectional study.

      Yambasu, EE; Reid, A; Owiti, P; Manzi, M; Murray, MJS; Edwin, AK (African Field Epidemiology Network, 2018-05-18)
      INTRODUCTION: Transmissible blood-borne infections are a serious threat to blood transfusion safety in West African countries; and yet blood remains a key therapeutic product in the clinical management of patients. Sierra Leone screens blood donors for blood-borne infections but has not implemented prevention of mother-to-child transmission for hepatitis B. This study aimed to describe the overall prevalence of hepatitis B and C, HIV and syphilis among blood donors in Sierra Leone in 2016 and to compare the differences between volunteer versus family replacement donors, as well as urban versus rural donors. METHODS: Retrospective, cross-sectional study from January-December 2016 in five blood bank laboratories across the country. Routinely-collected programme data were analyzed; blood donors were tested with rapid diagnostic tests-HBsAg for HBV, anti-HCV antibody for HCV, antibodies HIV1&2 for HIV and TPHA for syphilis. RESULTS: There were 16807 blood samples analysed, with 80% from males; 2285 (13.6%) tested positive for at least one of the four pathogens. Overall prevalence was: 9.7% hepatitis B; 1.0% hepatitis C; 2.8% HIV; 0.8% syphilis. Prevalence was higher among samples from rural blood banks, the difference most marked for hepatitis C. The proportion of voluntary donors was 12%. Family replacement donors had a higher prevalence of hepatitis B, C and HIV than volunteers. CONCLUSION: A high prevalence of blood-borne pathogens, particularly hepatitis B, was revealed in Sierra Leone blood donors. The study suggests the country should implement the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B and push to recruit more volunteer, non-remunerated blood donors.