• Does Research Through Structured Operational Research and Training (SORT IT) Courses Impact Policy and Practice?

      Kumar, AMV; Shewade, HD; Tripathy, JP; Guillerm, N; Tayler-Smith, K; Dar Berger, S; Bissell, K; Reid, AJ; Zachariah, R; Harries, AD (Cambridge University Press, 2016-03-21)
    • Does the Structured Operational Research and Training Initiative (SORT IT) continue to influence health policy and/or practice?

      Tripathy, JP; Kumar, AM; Guillerm, N; Berger, SD; Bissell, K; Reid, A; Zachariah, R; Ramsay, A; Harries, AD (Taylor & Francis, 2018-08-01)
      The Structured Operational Research and Training Initiative (SORT IT) is a successful model of integrated operational research and capacity building with about 90% of participants completing the training and publishing in scientific journals.
    • Is Adjunctive Naturopathy Associated with Improved Glycaemic Control and a Reduction in Need for Medications Among Type 2 Diabetes Patients? A Prospective Cohort Study from India

      Bairy, S; Kumar, AM; Raju, M; Achanta, S; Naik, B; Tripathy, JP; Zachariah, R (BioMed Central, 2016-08-17)
      With an estimated 65 million Diabetes Mellitus (DM) patients, India ranks second in the world in terms of DM burden. The emphasis of current medical practice has been on pharmacotherapy but, despite the best combination therapies, acheiving glycaemic control (reduction of blood sugar to desirable levels) is a challenge. 'Integrated Naturopathy and Yoga'(INY) is an alternative system of medicine that lays emphasis on the role of diet and physical exercise. We assessed the short term effect of INY as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy on glycaemic control among type 2 DM patients.
    • "Small small interventions, big big roles"- a qualitative study of patient, care-giver and health-care worker experiences of a palliative care programme in Kerala, India

      Philip, RP; Venables, E; Manima, A; Tripathy, JP; Philip, S (BMC, 2019-02-04)
      Background: Home-based palliative care is an essential resource for many communities. We conducted a qualitative study to explore perceptions of a home-based palliative care programme in Kerala, India, from the perspective of patients, their care-givers and the doctors, nurses and volunteers running the intervention. Methods: A descriptive qualitative study was carried out. One focus group discussion (FGD) was conducted with patients (n = 8) and two with male and female volunteers (n = 12); and interviews were conducted with doctors (n = 3), nurses (n = 3) and care-givers (n = 14). FGDs and interviews were conducted in Malayalam, audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and translated into English. Transcripts were coded and analysed using manual content analysis. Results: Doctors, nurses and volunteers have interdependent roles in providing palliative care to patients, including mentorship, training, patient care and advocating for patient needs. Volunteers also considered themselves to be mediators between families and the programme. Care-givers were mainly female and were caring for relatives. They have physically demanding, psychologically stressful and socially restrictive experiences of care-giving. They felt that the programme facilitated their role as care-givers by giving them training and support. Patients with long standing illnesses felt that the programme enabled them to become more independent and self-reliant. The local community supports the programme through economic contributions and offering practical assistance to patients. Conclusion: The salient features of this programme include the provision of regular holistic care through a team of doctors, nurses and patients. The programme was perceived to have improved the lives of patients and their care-givers. The involvement of volunteers from the local community was perceived as a strength of the programme, whilst simultaneously being a challenge.
    • Ten Tips to Improve the Visibility and Dissemination of Research for Policy Makers and Practitioners

      Tripathy, JP; Bhatnagar, A; Shewade, HD; Kumar, AMV; Zachariah, R; Harries, AD (International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2017-03-21)
    • Twenty years of home-based palliative care in Malappuram, Kerala, India: a descriptive study of patients and their care-givers

      Philip, RR; Philip, S; Tripathy, JP; Manima, A; Venables, E (BioMed Central, 2018-02-14)
      The well lauded community-based palliative care programme of Kerala, India provides medical and social support, through home-based care, for patients with terminal illness and diseases requiring long-term support. There is, however, limited information on patient characteristics, caregivers and programme performance. This study was carried out to describe: i) the patients enrolled in the programme from 1996 to 2016 and their diagnosis, and ii) the care-giver characteristics and palliative care support from nurses and doctors in a cohort of patients registered during 2013-2015.