• Is there a correlation between malaria incidence and IRS coverage in western Zambezi region, Namibia?

      Mumbengegwi, DR; Sturrock, H; Hsiang, M; Roberts, K; Kleinschmidt, I; Nghipumbwa, M; Uusiku, P; Smith, J; Bennet, A; Kizito, W; et al. (International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2018-04-25)
      Setting: A comparison of routine Namibia National Malaria Programme data (reported) vs. household survey data (administrative) on indoor residual spraying (IRS) in western Zambezi region, Namibia, for the 2014-2015 malaria season. Objectives: To determine 1) IRS coverage (administrative and reported), 2) its effect on malaria incidence, and 3) reasons for non-uptake of IRS in western Zambezi region, Namibia, for the 2014-2015 malaria season. Design: This was a descriptive study. Results: IRS coverage in western Zambezi region was low, ranging from 42.3% to 52.2% for administrative coverage vs. 45.9-66.7% for reported coverage. There was no significant correlation between IRS coverage and malaria incidence for this region (r = -0.45, P = 0.22). The main reasons for households not being sprayed were that residents were not at home during spraying times or that spray operators did not visit the households. Conclusions: IRS coverage in western Zambezi region, Namibia, was low during the 2014-2015 malaria season because of poor community engagement and awareness of times for spray operations within communities. Higher IRS coverage could be achieved through improved community engagement. Better targeting of the highest risk areas by the use of malaria surveillance will be required to mitigate malaria transmission.
    • Moving towards malaria elimination: trends and attributes of cases in Kavango region, Namibia, 2010-2014

      Nghipumbwa, H; Ade, S; Kizito, W; Takarinda, KC; Uusiku, P; Mumbegegwi, DR (International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2018-04-25)
      Setting: Kavango, a 'moderate' transmission risk region located in north-eastern Namibia, borders Angola, a country with higher malaria transmission levels. Objective: To determine 1) the trends in malaria incidence between 2010 and 2014 in Kavango, 2) the socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of confirmed cases in 2014, and 3) associated risk factors of cases classified as imported. Design: This was a retrospective study of malaria case investigation forms conducted in all 52 public health facilities in 2014. Incidence was derived from aggregate routine surveillance data from the Health Information System (HIS). Results: During the 5-year study, incidence fell from 53.6 to 3.6 cases per 1000 population, then increased again to 47.3/1000. Fifty-five per cent of cases were males, and 49% were aged between 5 and 17 years. Of the 2014 cases, 23% were imported, and were associated with higher odds of severe malaria (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.8; 95%CI 1.01-3.29), not having long-lasting insecticide treated nets (aOR 2.1, 95%CI, 1.3-3.4) and not receiving insecticide residual spraying (aOR 3.2, 95%CI, 2.1-5.1). Conclusion: Sporadic outbreaks in the 5-year period posed a threat to malaria elimination. Better targeting of vector control interventions, strong cross-border collaboration and robust health promotion will be key to achieving malaria elimination.