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dc.contributor.authorPage, Anne-Laure
dc.contributor.authorJusot, Viviane
dc.contributor.authorMamaty, Abdoul-Aziz
dc.contributor.authorAdamou, Lagare
dc.contributor.authorKaplon, Jérôme
dc.contributor.authorPothier, Pierre
dc.contributor.authorDjibo, Ali
dc.contributor.authorManzo, Mahamane L.
dc.contributor.authorToure, Brahima
dc.contributor.authorLangendorf, Céline
dc.contributor.authorCollard, Jean-Marc
dc.contributor.authorGrais, Rebecca F.
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-26T20:35:44Z
dc.date.available2014-03-26T20:35:44Z
dc.date.issued2014-03
dc.identifier.citationRotavirus Surveillance in Urban and Rural Areas of Niger, April 2010–March 2012 2014, 20 (4):573 Emerging Infectious Diseasesen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1080-6040
dc.identifier.issn1080-6059
dc.identifier.doi10.3201/eid2004.131328
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/314784
dc.descriptionTo access this article, click on "Additional Links".en_GB
dc.description.abstractKnowledge of rotavirus epidemiology is necessary to make informed decisions about vaccine introduction and to evaluate vaccine impact. During April 2010–March 2012, rotavirus surveillance was conducted among 9,745 children <5 years of age in 14 hospitals/health centers in Niger, where rotavirus vaccine has not been introduced. Study participants had acute watery diarrhea and moderate to severe dehydration, and 20% of the children were enrolled in a nutrition program. Of the 9,745 children, 30.6% were rotavirus positive. Genotyping of a subset of positive samples showed a variety of genotypes during the first year, although G2P[4] predominated. G12 genotypes, including G12P[8], which has emerged as a predominant strain in western Africa, represented >80% of isolates during the second year. Hospitalization and death rates and severe dehydration among rotavirus case-patients did not differ during the 2 years. The emergence of G12P[8] warrants close attention to the characteristics of associated epidemics and possible prevention measures.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCenters for Disease Control and Preventionen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/20/4/13-1328_article.htmen_GB
dc.rightsPublished by Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Archived on this site by permission of CDC, [url]http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/eid[/url]en_GB
dc.subjectDiarrheal Diseases (non-Cholera)en_GB
dc.titleRotavirus Surveillance in Urban and Rural Areas of Niger, April 2010–March 2012en
dc.identifier.journalEmerging Infectious Diseasesen_GB
html.description.abstractKnowledge of rotavirus epidemiology is necessary to make informed decisions about vaccine introduction and to evaluate vaccine impact. During April 2010–March 2012, rotavirus surveillance was conducted among 9,745 children <5 years of age in 14 hospitals/health centers in Niger, where rotavirus vaccine has not been introduced. Study participants had acute watery diarrhea and moderate to severe dehydration, and 20% of the children were enrolled in a nutrition program. Of the 9,745 children, 30.6% were rotavirus positive. Genotyping of a subset of positive samples showed a variety of genotypes during the first year, although G2P[4] predominated. G12 genotypes, including G12P[8], which has emerged as a predominant strain in western Africa, represented >80% of isolates during the second year. Hospitalization and death rates and severe dehydration among rotavirus case-patients did not differ during the 2 years. The emergence of G12P[8] warrants close attention to the characteristics of associated epidemics and possible prevention measures.


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