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dc.contributor.authorKhandu, L
dc.contributor.authorZachariah, R
dc.contributor.authorVan den Bergh, R
dc.contributor.authorWangchuk, D
dc.contributor.authorTshering, N
dc.contributor.authorWangmo, D
dc.contributor.authorAnanthakrishnan, R
dc.contributor.authorDorji, T
dc.contributor.authorSatyanarayana, S
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-31T21:17:29Z
dc.date.available2014-03-31T21:17:29Z
dc.date.issued2014-03
dc.identifier.citationPHA 2014; 4(1): 22–27en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/315047
dc.description.abstractSetting: Two free-standing urban human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing and counselling (HCT) centres in Bhutan offering services to the general population and targeting the most at-risk populations (MARPs). Objectives: To assess the trend in testing for HIV, hepatitis B and syphilis in both the general population and MARPs, and to determine if sociodemographic and risk behaviour characteristics are associated with HIV, hepatitis B and syphilis seropositivity. Design: Cross-sectional study using client records, 2009–2012. Results: Of 7894 clients, 3009 (38%) were from the general population, while 4885 (62%) were from MARPs. Over the 4-year period, testing declined progressively among the general population, while it increased or remained static for MARPs. Of 4885 MARPs, seropositivity was respectively 0.7%, 1.3% and 1.2% for HIV, hepatitis B and syphilis. Female sex workers (FSWs) (relative risk[RR] 4.4, P=0.03) and partners of person living with HIV(RR 25.9, P<0.001) had a higher risk of being HIV-positive. FSWs had also a greater risk of being syphilis-positive(RR 9.1, P<0.001). Conclusion: The increase in uptake of HCT services by MARPs is a welcome finding; however, the relatively static trends call for the introduction of community outreach approaches. The critical gateway being provided to MARPs is an ‘opportunity’ for the expansion of the current service package.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseaseen_GB
dc.subjectCourse on Operational Researchen_GB
dc.subjectHIV/AIDSen_GB
dc.titleProviding a gateway to prevention and care for the most at-risk populations in Bhutan: is this being achieved?en
dc.identifier.journalPublic Health Actionen_GB
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T11:12:37Z
html.description.abstractSetting: Two free-standing urban human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing and counselling (HCT) centres in Bhutan offering services to the general population and targeting the most at-risk populations (MARPs). Objectives: To assess the trend in testing for HIV, hepatitis B and syphilis in both the general population and MARPs, and to determine if sociodemographic and risk behaviour characteristics are associated with HIV, hepatitis B and syphilis seropositivity. Design: Cross-sectional study using client records, 2009–2012. Results: Of 7894 clients, 3009 (38%) were from the general population, while 4885 (62%) were from MARPs. Over the 4-year period, testing declined progressively among the general population, while it increased or remained static for MARPs. Of 4885 MARPs, seropositivity was respectively 0.7%, 1.3% and 1.2% for HIV, hepatitis B and syphilis. Female sex workers (FSWs) (relative risk[RR] 4.4, P=0.03) and partners of person living with HIV(RR 25.9, P<0.001) had a higher risk of being HIV-positive. FSWs had also a greater risk of being syphilis-positive(RR 9.1, P<0.001). Conclusion: The increase in uptake of HCT services by MARPs is a welcome finding; however, the relatively static trends call for the introduction of community outreach approaches. The critical gateway being provided to MARPs is an ‘opportunity’ for the expansion of the current service package.


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