Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKhogali, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorZachariah, Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorReid, A Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAlipon, S Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZimble, Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGbane, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorEtienne, Wen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVeerman, Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorHassan, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHarries, A Den_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-31T21:27:40Z
dc.date.available2014-03-31T21:27:40Z
dc.date.issued2014-03
dc.identifier.citationPHA 2014; 4(1): 12-14en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/315048
dc.description.abstractIn a pastoralist setting in Ethiopia, we assessed changes in attendance between the first and subsequent antenatal care (ANC) visits following the implementation of non-monetary incentives in a primary health care centre over a 3-year period from October 2009 to September 2012. Incentives included the provision of a bar of soap,a bucket, a mosquito net, sugar, cooking oil, a jerrycan and a delivery kit. The first ANC visits increased by 48% in the first year to 60% in the second. Subsequent visits did not show a similar pattern due to ruptures in incentive stocks. Incentives appear to increase ANC attendance; however, ruptures in stock should be avoided to sustain the effect.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseaseen_GB
dc.subjectMaternal Care/Women's Healthen_GB
dc.subjectOperational Researchen_GB
dc.titleDo non-monetary incentives for pregnant women increase antenatal attendance among Ethiopian pastoralists?en
dc.identifier.journalPublic Health Actionen_GB
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T11:12:43Z
html.description.abstractIn a pastoralist setting in Ethiopia, we assessed changes in attendance between the first and subsequent antenatal care (ANC) visits following the implementation of non-monetary incentives in a primary health care centre over a 3-year period from October 2009 to September 2012. Incentives included the provision of a bar of soap,a bucket, a mosquito net, sugar, cooking oil, a jerrycan and a delivery kit. The first ANC visits increased by 48% in the first year to 60% in the second. Subsequent visits did not show a similar pattern due to ruptures in incentive stocks. Incentives appear to increase ANC attendance; however, ruptures in stock should be avoided to sustain the effect.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Khogali et al-2014-Do non-monetary ...
Size:
139.1Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record