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dc.contributor.authorBurza, Sakib*
dc.contributor.authorMahajan, Raman*
dc.contributor.authorSinha, Prabhat K*
dc.contributor.authorvan Griensven, Johan*
dc.contributor.authorPandey, Krishna*
dc.contributor.authorLima, María Angeles*
dc.contributor.authorSanz, Marta Gonzalez*
dc.contributor.authorSunyoto, Temmy*
dc.contributor.authorKumar, Sunil*
dc.contributor.authorMitra, Gaurab*
dc.contributor.authorKumar, Ranjeet*
dc.contributor.authorVerma, Neena*
dc.contributor.authorDas, Pradeep*
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-25T16:33:07Z
dc.date.available2014-08-25T16:33:07Z
dc.date.issued2014-08-07
dc.identifier.citationVisceral Leishmaniasis and HIV Co-infection in Bihar, India: Long-term Effectiveness and Treatment Outcomes with Liposomal Amphotericin B (AmBisome). 2014, 8 (8):e3053 PLoS Negl Trop Disen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1935-2735
dc.identifier.pmid25101665
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pntd.0003053
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/325190
dc.description.abstractVisceral Leishmaniasis (VL; also known as kala-azar) is an ultimately fatal disease endemic in the Indian state of Bihar, while HIV/AIDS is an emerging disease in this region. A 2011 observational cohort study conducted in Bihar involving 55 VL/HIV co-infected patients treated with 20-25 mg/kg intravenous liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome) estimated an 85.5% probability of survival and a 26.5% probability of VL relapse within 2 years. Here we report the long-term field outcomes of a larger cohort of co-infected patients treated with this regimen between 2007 and 2012.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPLoSen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseasesen_GB
dc.titleVisceral Leishmaniasis and HIV Co-infection in Bihar, India: Long-term Effectiveness and Treatment Outcomes with Liposomal Amphotericin B (AmBisome).en
dc.identifier.journalPLoS Neglected Tropical Diseasesen_GB
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T11:23:18Z
html.description.abstractVisceral Leishmaniasis (VL; also known as kala-azar) is an ultimately fatal disease endemic in the Indian state of Bihar, while HIV/AIDS is an emerging disease in this region. A 2011 observational cohort study conducted in Bihar involving 55 VL/HIV co-infected patients treated with 20-25 mg/kg intravenous liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome) estimated an 85.5% probability of survival and a 26.5% probability of VL relapse within 2 years. Here we report the long-term field outcomes of a larger cohort of co-infected patients treated with this regimen between 2007 and 2012.


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