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dc.contributor.authorProtopopoff, N
dc.contributor.authorVan Bortel, W
dc.contributor.authorMarcotty, T
dc.contributor.authorVan Herp, M
dc.contributor.authorMaes, P
dc.contributor.authorBaza, D
dc.contributor.authorD'Alessandro, U
dc.contributor.authorCoosemans, M
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-08T08:24:33Z
dc.date.available2008-09-08T08:24:33Z
dc.date.issued2008-07
dc.identifier.citationSpatial targeted vector control is able to reduce malaria prevalence in the highlands of Burundi. 2008, 79 (1):12-8 Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.en
dc.identifier.issn1476-1645
dc.identifier.pmid18606758
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/37432
dc.description.abstractIn a highland province of Burundi, indoor residual spraying and long-lasting insecticidal net distribution were targeted in the valley, aiming also to protect the population living on the hilltops. The impact on malaria indicators was assessed, and the potential additional effect of nets evaluated. After the intervention--and compared with the control valleys--children 1-9 years old in the treated valleys had lower risks of malaria infection (odds ratio, OR: 0.55), high parasite density (OR: 0.48), and clinical malaria (OR: 0.57). The impact on malaria prevalence was even higher in infants (OR: 0.14). Using nets did not confer an additional protective effect to spraying. Targeted vector control had a major impact on malaria in the high-risk valleys but not in the less-exposed hilltops. Investment in targeted and regular control measures associated with effective case management should be able to control malaria in the highlands.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygieneen
dc.rightsArchived on this site with the kind permission of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, http://www.astmh.orgen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshAnophelesen
dc.subject.meshBedding and Linensen
dc.subject.meshBurundien
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFumigationen
dc.subject.meshHousingen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshInsect Bites and Stingsen
dc.subject.meshInsect Vectorsen
dc.subject.meshInsecticidesen
dc.subject.meshMalariaen
dc.subject.meshMosquito Controlen
dc.subject.meshSporozoitesen
dc.subject.meshTopography, Medicalen
dc.titleSpatial targeted vector control is able to reduce malaria prevalence in the highlands of Burundi.en
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Parasitology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium. nprotopopoff@itg.been
dc.identifier.journalThe American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygieneen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T11:59:49Z
html.description.abstractIn a highland province of Burundi, indoor residual spraying and long-lasting insecticidal net distribution were targeted in the valley, aiming also to protect the population living on the hilltops. The impact on malaria indicators was assessed, and the potential additional effect of nets evaluated. After the intervention--and compared with the control valleys--children 1-9 years old in the treated valleys had lower risks of malaria infection (odds ratio, OR: 0.55), high parasite density (OR: 0.48), and clinical malaria (OR: 0.57). The impact on malaria prevalence was even higher in infants (OR: 0.14). Using nets did not confer an additional protective effect to spraying. Targeted vector control had a major impact on malaria in the high-risk valleys but not in the less-exposed hilltops. Investment in targeted and regular control measures associated with effective case management should be able to control malaria in the highlands.


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