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dc.contributor.authorRaguenaud, M E
dc.contributor.authorZachariah, R
dc.contributor.authorMassaquoi, M
dc.contributor.authorOmbeka, V
dc.contributor.authorRitter, H
dc.contributor.authorChakaya, J
dc.date.accessioned2008-10-24T15:12:45Z
dc.date.available2008-10-24T15:12:45Z
dc.date.issued2008-10-22
dc.identifier.citationGlobal Public Health, Oct 2008 3(4): 433-439en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/39583
dc.descriptionTo access this article, click on "Additional Links".
dc.description.abstractWe conducted a study among patients with tuberculosis (TB) attending two health facilities - a hospital and a slum health centre - in Nairobi, in order to: (a) assess adherence to anti-TB treatment; and (b) identify reasons for non-adherence. Urine Isoniazid (INH), used as a proxy for overall adherence, was detected in 142 (97%) (95% CI 92-99) of the 147 patients involved in the study. Five patients had no INH detected in urine and had run out of pills within the previous three days. The reasons included: not having enough pills to last until the next appointment date (1); and losing some pills (1). Anti-TB treatment adherence is high, and is reassuring information as Kenya plans to change to a superior first-line regimen based on rifampicin throughout the course of anti-TB treatment. Providing patients with a three-day "excess stock" of pills would provide a "safety net" for continued treatment.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1744-1692&volume=3&issue=4&spage=433
dc.rightsArchived on this site with thanks to Taylor & Francisen
dc.titleHigh adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment among patients attending a hospital and slum health centre in Nairobi, Kenyaen
dc.contributor.departmentMedecins Sans Fronteresen
dc.identifier.journalGlobal Public Healthen
html.description.abstractWe conducted a study among patients with tuberculosis (TB) attending two health facilities - a hospital and a slum health centre - in Nairobi, in order to: (a) assess adherence to anti-TB treatment; and (b) identify reasons for non-adherence. Urine Isoniazid (INH), used as a proxy for overall adherence, was detected in 142 (97%) (95% CI 92-99) of the 147 patients involved in the study. Five patients had no INH detected in urine and had run out of pills within the previous three days. The reasons included: not having enough pills to last until the next appointment date (1); and losing some pills (1). Anti-TB treatment adherence is high, and is reassuring information as Kenya plans to change to a superior first-line regimen based on rifampicin throughout the course of anti-TB treatment. Providing patients with a three-day "excess stock" of pills would provide a "safety net" for continued treatment.


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