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dc.contributor.authorReid, T
dc.contributor.authorvan Engelgem, I
dc.contributor.authorTelfer, B
dc.contributor.authorManzi, M
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-10T12:04:24Z
dc.date.available2009-02-10T12:04:24Z
dc.date.issued2008-12
dc.identifier.citationProviding HIV care in the aftermath of Kenya's post-election violence Medecins Sans Frontieres' lessons learned January - March 2008. 2008, 2:15notConfl Healthen
dc.identifier.issn1752-1505
dc.identifier.pmid19055803
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1752-1505-2-15
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/48816
dc.description.abstractABSTRACT: Kenya's post-election violence in early 2008 created considerable problems for health services, and in particular, those providing HIV care. It was feared that the disruptions in services would lead to widespread treatment interruption. MSF had been working in the Kibera slum for 10 years and was providing antiretroviral therapy to 1800 patients when the violence broke out. MSF responded to the crisis in a number of ways and managed to keep HIV services going. Treatment interruption was less than expected, and MSF profited from a number of "lessons learned" that could be applied to similar contexts where a stable situation suddenly deteriorates.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Conflict and Health and Open Accessen
dc.titleProviding HIV care in the aftermath of Kenya's post-election violence Medecins Sans Frontieres' lessons learned January - March 2008.en
dc.contributor.departmentMSF Brussels, rue Dupre 94, Brussels 1090, Belgium. tony.reid@brussels.msf.org.en
dc.identifier.journalConflict and Healthen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T12:10:56Z
html.description.abstractABSTRACT: Kenya's post-election violence in early 2008 created considerable problems for health services, and in particular, those providing HIV care. It was feared that the disruptions in services would lead to widespread treatment interruption. MSF had been working in the Kibera slum for 10 years and was providing antiretroviral therapy to 1800 patients when the violence broke out. MSF responded to the crisis in a number of ways and managed to keep HIV services going. Treatment interruption was less than expected, and MSF profited from a number of "lessons learned" that could be applied to similar contexts where a stable situation suddenly deteriorates.


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