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dc.contributor.authorHill, J E
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-27T19:40:27Z
dc.date.available2015-04-27T19:40:27Z
dc.date.issued2014-08
dc.identifier.citationChanges to intellectual property policy in South Africa: putting a stop to evergreening? 2014, 24 (8):839-43 Expert Opin Ther Paten_GB
dc.identifier.issn1744-7674
dc.identifier.pmid24965317
dc.identifier.doi10.1517/13543776.2014.931376
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/550757
dc.description.abstractSouth Africa is a middle-income country with the world's largest HIV patient cohort and a growing burden of communicable and non-communicable diseases - a prime location for pharmaceutical companies looking to expand their markets. Yet, 20 years after the country's first democratic elections, poor health indicators and an over-burdened public health system belie persistently stark levels of socioeconomic inequality. As the South African government revises national intellectual property (IP) policies, the pharmaceutical industry and global access to medicines movement are watching, aware of ramifications South Africa's actions will have on patent laws and the availability of generic medicines in other middle-income countries and across Africa. South Africa's draft IP policy is meeting fierce resistance from industry, although proposed reforms are compliant with the Agreement on trade related aspects of intellectual property (TRIPS) and in line with on-going policies and actions of both developing and developed countries. Could the establishment of a patent examination system and new patentability criteria rein in evergreening and lead to lower medicine prices? What will be the potential impact of reform on medical innovation? And why is it both necessary and urgent that the South African government seek a fairer balance between private and public interests?
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare/Expert Reviewsen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Expert Opinion on Therapeutic Patents open access optionen_GB
dc.subject.meshDrug Industryen_GB
dc.subject.meshDrugs, Genericen_GB
dc.subject.meshHealth Services Accessibilityen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIntellectual Propertyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPatents as Topicen_GB
dc.subject.meshPublic Healthen_GB
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshSouth Africaen_GB
dc.titleChanges to intellectual property policy in South Africa: putting a stop to evergreening?en
dc.identifier.journalExpert Opinion on Therapeutic Patentsen_GB
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T12:23:48Z
html.description.abstractSouth Africa is a middle-income country with the world's largest HIV patient cohort and a growing burden of communicable and non-communicable diseases - a prime location for pharmaceutical companies looking to expand their markets. Yet, 20 years after the country's first democratic elections, poor health indicators and an over-burdened public health system belie persistently stark levels of socioeconomic inequality. As the South African government revises national intellectual property (IP) policies, the pharmaceutical industry and global access to medicines movement are watching, aware of ramifications South Africa's actions will have on patent laws and the availability of generic medicines in other middle-income countries and across Africa. South Africa's draft IP policy is meeting fierce resistance from industry, although proposed reforms are compliant with the Agreement on trade related aspects of intellectual property (TRIPS) and in line with on-going policies and actions of both developing and developed countries. Could the establishment of a patent examination system and new patentability criteria rein in evergreening and lead to lower medicine prices? What will be the potential impact of reform on medical innovation? And why is it both necessary and urgent that the South African government seek a fairer balance between private and public interests?


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