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dc.contributor.authorFitzpatrick, Gabriel
dc.contributor.authorVogt, Florian
dc.contributor.authorGbabai, Osman B Moi
dc.contributor.authorDecroo, Tom
dc.contributor.authorKeane, Marian
dc.contributor.authorDe Clerck, Hilde
dc.contributor.authorGrolla, Allen
dc.contributor.authorBrechard, Raphael
dc.contributor.authorStinson, Kathryn
dc.contributor.authorVan Herp, Michel
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-15T18:05:20Z
dc.date.available2015-07-15T18:05:20Z
dc.date.issued2015-05-22
dc.identifier.citationThe contribution of Ebola viral load at admission and other patient characteristics to mortality in a Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Ebola Case Management Centre (CMC), Kailahun, Sierra Leone, June -October, 2014. 2015: J. Infect. Dis.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1537-6613
dc.identifier.pmid26002981
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/infdis/jiv304
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/560498
dc.description.abstractThis paper describes patient characteristics, including Ebola viral load, associated with mortality in an MSF Ebola case management centre. Out of 780 admissions between June and October 2014, 525 (67%) were positive for Ebola with a known outcome. The crude mortality rate was 51% (270/525). Ebola viral load (whole blood sample) data was available on 76% (397/525) of patients. Univariate analysis indicated viral load at admission, age, symptom duration prior to admission and distance travelled to the CMC were associated with mortality (p value<0.05). The multivariable model predicted mortality in those with a viral load at admission greater than 10 million copies per millilitre (p value<0.05, Odds Ratio>10), aged 50 years or more (p value=0.08, Odds Ratio=2) and symptom duration prior to admission less than 5 days (p value=0.14). The presence of confusion, diarrhoea and conjunctivitis were significantly higher (p value<0.05) in Ebola patients who died. These findings highlight the importance viral load at admission has on mortality outcomes and could be used to cohort cases with viral loads greater than 10 million copies into dedicated wards with more intensive medical support to further reduce mortality.
dc.languageENG
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_GB
dc.rightsPublished by Infectious Diseases Society of America Archived on this site with permission and copyright 2015 by the Infectious Diseases Society of America, [url] and Oxford University Press's Open Access optionen_GB
dc.titleThe contribution of Ebola viral load at admission and other patient characteristics to mortality in a Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Ebola Case Management Centre (CMC), Kailahun, Sierra Leone, June -October, 2014en
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of Infectious Diseasesen_GB
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T12:26:26Z
html.description.abstractThis paper describes patient characteristics, including Ebola viral load, associated with mortality in an MSF Ebola case management centre. Out of 780 admissions between June and October 2014, 525 (67%) were positive for Ebola with a known outcome. The crude mortality rate was 51% (270/525). Ebola viral load (whole blood sample) data was available on 76% (397/525) of patients. Univariate analysis indicated viral load at admission, age, symptom duration prior to admission and distance travelled to the CMC were associated with mortality (p value<0.05). The multivariable model predicted mortality in those with a viral load at admission greater than 10 million copies per millilitre (p value<0.05, Odds Ratio>10), aged 50 years or more (p value=0.08, Odds Ratio=2) and symptom duration prior to admission less than 5 days (p value=0.14). The presence of confusion, diarrhoea and conjunctivitis were significantly higher (p value<0.05) in Ebola patients who died. These findings highlight the importance viral load at admission has on mortality outcomes and could be used to cohort cases with viral loads greater than 10 million copies into dedicated wards with more intensive medical support to further reduce mortality.


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