Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBhalla, Nen
dc.contributor.authorHussein, Nen
dc.contributor.authorAtari, Men
dc.contributor.authorFakhri, RMen
dc.contributor.authorLepora, Cen
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Nen
dc.contributor.authorCosgrove, SEen
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, RAen
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-12T12:08:37Z
dc.date.available2016-11-12T12:08:37Z
dc.date.issued2016-11-01
dc.date.submitted2016-11-09
dc.identifier.citationIntroducing An Antibiotic Stewardship Program In A Humanitarian Surgical Hospital. 2016, 44 (11):1381-1384 Am J Infect Controlen
dc.identifier.issn1527-3296
dc.identifier.pmid27207158
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ajic.2016.03.036
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/618709
dc.description.abstractAntibiotic stewardship program (ASP) implementation in humanitarian settings is a new endeavor. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières introduced an ASP within a hospital in Amman, Jordan, where patients from Iraq, Syria, and Yemen with chronic, often multidrug-resistant, infections related to war are managed. Antibiotics were reviewed, and real-time recommendations were made to optimize choice, dose, duration, and route by a small team. Over the first year of implementation, acceptance of the ASP's recommendations improved. When compared with the year prior to implementation, antibiotic cost in 2014 declined considerably from approximately $252,077 (average, $21,006/month) to <$159,948 ($13,329/month), and a reduction in use of broad-spectrum agents was observed. An ASP in a humanitarian surgical hospital proved acceptable and effective, reducing antibiotic expenditures and use of broad-spectrum agents.
dc.languageENG
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to American Journal of Infection Control.en
dc.titleIntroducing An Antibiotic Stewardship Program In A Humanitarian Surgical Hospitalen
dc.identifier.journalAmerican Journal of Infection Controlen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T12:58:20Z
html.description.abstractAntibiotic stewardship program (ASP) implementation in humanitarian settings is a new endeavor. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières introduced an ASP within a hospital in Amman, Jordan, where patients from Iraq, Syria, and Yemen with chronic, often multidrug-resistant, infections related to war are managed. Antibiotics were reviewed, and real-time recommendations were made to optimize choice, dose, duration, and route by a small team. Over the first year of implementation, acceptance of the ASP's recommendations improved. When compared with the year prior to implementation, antibiotic cost in 2014 declined considerably from approximately $252,077 (average, $21,006/month) to <$159,948 ($13,329/month), and a reduction in use of broad-spectrum agents was observed. An ASP in a humanitarian surgical hospital proved acceptable and effective, reducing antibiotic expenditures and use of broad-spectrum agents.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Bhalla N et al - 2016 - Introducing ...
Size:
411.8Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record