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dc.contributor.authorSylvester Squire, Jen
dc.contributor.authorHann, Ken
dc.contributor.authorDenisiuk, Oen
dc.contributor.authorKamara, Men
dc.contributor.authorTamang, Den
dc.contributor.authorZachariah, Ren
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-05T20:41:12Z
dc.date.available2017-08-05T20:41:12Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-21
dc.date.submitted2017-08-03
dc.identifier.citationThe Ebola Outbreak and Staffing in Public Health Facilities in Rural Sierra Leone: Who is Left to do the Job? 2017, 7 (Suppl 1):S47-S54 Public Health Actionen
dc.identifier.issn2220-8372
dc.identifier.pmid28744439
dc.identifier.doi10.5588/pha.16.0089
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/618977
dc.description.abstractSetting: The 82 public health facilities of rural Kailahun District, Sierra Leone. Objective: The 2014-2015 Ebola virus disease outbreak in Sierra Leone led the Ministry of Health and Sanitation and stakeholders to set minimum standards of staffing (medical/non-medical) for a basic package of essential health services (BPEHS). No district-level information exists on staffing levels in relation to the Ebola outbreak. We examined the staffing levels before the Ebola outbreak, during the last month of the outbreak and 4 months after the outbreak, as well as Ebola-related deaths among health care workers (HCWs). Design: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study. Results: Of 805 recommended medical staff (the minimum requirement for 82 health facilities), there were deficits of 539 (67%) pre-Ebola, 528 (65%) during the Ebola outbreak and 501 (62%) post-Ebola, hovering at staff shortages of >50% at all levels of health facilities. Of the 569 requisite non-medical staff, the gap remained consistent, at 92%, in the three time periods. Of the 1374 overall HCWs recommended by the BPEHS, the current staff shortage is 1026 (75%). Of 321 facility-based HCWs present during Ebola, there were 15 (14 medical and one non-medical staff) Ebola-related and three non-Ebola related deaths among HCWs. Conclusion: The post-Ebola health-related human resource deficit is alarmingly high, with very few staff available to work. We call for urgent political will, resources and international collaboration to address this situation.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseaseen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Public Health Actionen
dc.titleThe Ebola Outbreak and Staffing in Public Health Facilities in Rural Sierra Leone: Who is Left to do the Job?en
dc.identifier.journalPublic Health Actionen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T13:31:38Z
html.description.abstractSetting: The 82 public health facilities of rural Kailahun District, Sierra Leone. Objective: The 2014-2015 Ebola virus disease outbreak in Sierra Leone led the Ministry of Health and Sanitation and stakeholders to set minimum standards of staffing (medical/non-medical) for a basic package of essential health services (BPEHS). No district-level information exists on staffing levels in relation to the Ebola outbreak. We examined the staffing levels before the Ebola outbreak, during the last month of the outbreak and 4 months after the outbreak, as well as Ebola-related deaths among health care workers (HCWs). Design: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study. Results: Of 805 recommended medical staff (the minimum requirement for 82 health facilities), there were deficits of 539 (67%) pre-Ebola, 528 (65%) during the Ebola outbreak and 501 (62%) post-Ebola, hovering at staff shortages of >50% at all levels of health facilities. Of the 569 requisite non-medical staff, the gap remained consistent, at 92%, in the three time periods. Of the 1374 overall HCWs recommended by the BPEHS, the current staff shortage is 1026 (75%). Of 321 facility-based HCWs present during Ebola, there were 15 (14 medical and one non-medical staff) Ebola-related and three non-Ebola related deaths among HCWs. Conclusion: The post-Ebola health-related human resource deficit is alarmingly high, with very few staff available to work. We call for urgent political will, resources and international collaboration to address this situation.


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