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dc.contributor.authorVenables, E
dc.contributor.authorPellecchia, U
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-05T20:42:36Z
dc.date.available2017-08-05T20:42:36Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-01
dc.date.submitted2017-08-03
dc.identifier.citationEngaging Anthropology in an Ebola Outbreak: Case Studies from West Africa. 2017, 24 (2):1 Anthropology in Actionen
dc.identifier.issn0967-201X
dc.identifier.issn1752-2285
dc.identifier.doi10.3167/aia.2017.240201
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/618979
dc.description.abstractThe articles in this special issue demonstrate, through ethnographic fieldwork and observations, how anthropologists and the methodological tools of their discipline became a means of understanding the Ebola outbreak in West Africa during 2014 and 2015. The examples, from Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone, show how anthropologists were involved in the Ebola outbreak at different points during the crisis and the contributions their work made. Discussing issues including health promotion, gender, quarantine and Ebola survivors, the authors show the diverse roles played by anthropologists and the different ways in which they made use of the tools of their discipline. The case studies draw upon the ethical, methodological and logistical challenges of conducting fieldwork during a crisis such as this one and offer reflections upon the role of anthropology in this context.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBerghahnen
dc.relation.urlhttp://berghahnjournals.com/view/journals/aia/24/2/aia240201.xmlen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Anthropology in Actionen
dc.titleEngaging Anthropology in an Ebola Outbreak: Case Studies from West Africaen
dc.identifier.journalAnthropology in Actionen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T13:31:50Z
html.description.abstractThe articles in this special issue demonstrate, through ethnographic fieldwork and observations, how anthropologists and the methodological tools of their discipline became a means of understanding the Ebola outbreak in West Africa during 2014 and 2015. The examples, from Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone, show how anthropologists were involved in the Ebola outbreak at different points during the crisis and the contributions their work made. Discussing issues including health promotion, gender, quarantine and Ebola survivors, the authors show the diverse roles played by anthropologists and the different ways in which they made use of the tools of their discipline. The case studies draw upon the ethical, methodological and logistical challenges of conducting fieldwork during a crisis such as this one and offer reflections upon the role of anthropology in this context.


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