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dc.contributor.authorWesseh, C
dc.contributor.authorNajjemba, R
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, J
dc.contributor.authorOwiti, P
dc.contributor.authorTweya, H
dc.contributor.authorBhat, P
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-05T20:43:25Z
dc.date.available2017-08-05T20:43:25Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-21
dc.date.submitted2017-08-03
dc.identifier.citationDid the Ebola Outbreak Disrupt Immunisation Services? A Case Study from Liberia. 2017, 7 (Suppl 1):S82-S87 Public Health Actionen
dc.identifier.issn2220-8372
dc.identifier.pmid28744444
dc.identifier.doi10.5588/pha.16.0104
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/618980
dc.description.abstractSetting: All health facilities providing routine immunisation services in Liberia. Objective: To compare the number of routine facility-based and outreach immunisations and measles cases before, during and after the Ebola outbreak. Design: A descriptive cross-sectional study. Results: Immunisation coverage for fully immunised children before the Ebola outbreak was 73%. Immunisation coverage for all antigens declined by half compared to baseline during the outbreak. These findings were similar in facility-based and outreach immunisations. During the outbreak, the proportion of fully immunised children dropped by respectively 58%, 33% and 39% in the most, moderately and least Ebola-affected counties. Immunisation rate of recovery in the post-Ebola period was respectively 82%, 21% and 9% in the most, moderately and least affected counties compared to the Ebola-outbreak period. Outreach immunisation recovered slowly compared to facility-based immunisation. The mean number of measles cases reported per month was 12 pre-Ebola, 16 Ebola and 60 post-Ebola. Conclusion: This study provides insights into the possible impact of an Ebola outbreak on countrywide immunisation. The outbreak weakened a struggling national immunisation programme, and post-outbreak recovery took significant time, which likely contributed to the measles epidemic. Recommendations for the improvement of immunisation services that could limit further preventable epidemics in Liberia and similar contexts at risk for Ebola are provided.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseaseen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Public Health Actionen
dc.titleDid the Ebola Outbreak Disrupt Immunisation Services? A Case Study from Liberiaen
dc.identifier.journalPublic Health Actionen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T13:31:56Z
html.description.abstractSetting: All health facilities providing routine immunisation services in Liberia. Objective: To compare the number of routine facility-based and outreach immunisations and measles cases before, during and after the Ebola outbreak. Design: A descriptive cross-sectional study. Results: Immunisation coverage for fully immunised children before the Ebola outbreak was 73%. Immunisation coverage for all antigens declined by half compared to baseline during the outbreak. These findings were similar in facility-based and outreach immunisations. During the outbreak, the proportion of fully immunised children dropped by respectively 58%, 33% and 39% in the most, moderately and least Ebola-affected counties. Immunisation rate of recovery in the post-Ebola period was respectively 82%, 21% and 9% in the most, moderately and least affected counties compared to the Ebola-outbreak period. Outreach immunisation recovered slowly compared to facility-based immunisation. The mean number of measles cases reported per month was 12 pre-Ebola, 16 Ebola and 60 post-Ebola. Conclusion: This study provides insights into the possible impact of an Ebola outbreak on countrywide immunisation. The outbreak weakened a struggling national immunisation programme, and post-outbreak recovery took significant time, which likely contributed to the measles epidemic. Recommendations for the improvement of immunisation services that could limit further preventable epidemics in Liberia and similar contexts at risk for Ebola are provided.


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