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dc.contributor.authorYassin, N
dc.contributor.authorTaha, A
dc.contributor.authorGhantous, Z
dc.contributor.authorAtoui, M
dc.contributor.authorForgione, F
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-22T14:14:31Z
dc.date.available2017-09-22T14:14:31Z
dc.date.issued2017-09-15
dc.identifier.citationEvaluating a Mental Health Program for Palestinian Refugees in Lebanon. 2017 J Immigr Minor Healthen
dc.identifier.issn1557-1920
dc.identifier.pmid28916882
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10903-017-0657-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/619015
dc.descriptionWe regret that this article is behind a paywall.en
dc.description.abstractMedecins sans Frontière, an international non-governmental organization, initiated a mental health program for Palestinian refugees living in Lebanon. To evaluate the impact of the program after its completion, focus groups were conducted with three target groups: (1) patients, (2) staff, and (3) local community stakeholders. Participants voiced overall satisfaction with the program. The program provided easy access, good quality care, decreased stigma, as perceived by participants, and revealed a sense of community contentedness. In addition, several short-term outcomes were achieved, such as increasing the numbers of patients visiting the center/ receiving mental health treatment. However, lack of planning for sustainability and proper procedures for hand-over of the program constituted a major downfall. Program discontinuation posed ethical dilemmas, common in provisional interventions in underprivileged refugee communities.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringerLinken
dc.titleEvaluating a Mental Health Program for Palestinian Refugees in Lebanonen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Healthen
html.description.abstractMedecins sans Frontière, an international non-governmental organization, initiated a mental health program for Palestinian refugees living in Lebanon. To evaluate the impact of the program after its completion, focus groups were conducted with three target groups: (1) patients, (2) staff, and (3) local community stakeholders. Participants voiced overall satisfaction with the program. The program provided easy access, good quality care, decreased stigma, as perceived by participants, and revealed a sense of community contentedness. In addition, several short-term outcomes were achieved, such as increasing the numbers of patients visiting the center/ receiving mental health treatment. However, lack of planning for sustainability and proper procedures for hand-over of the program constituted a major downfall. Program discontinuation posed ethical dilemmas, common in provisional interventions in underprivileged refugee communities.


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