Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSpina, Aen
dc.contributor.authorBeversluis, Den
dc.contributor.authorIrwin, Aen
dc.contributor.authorChen, Aen
dc.contributor.authorNassariman, JNen
dc.contributor.authorAhamat, Aen
dc.contributor.authorNoh, Ien
dc.contributor.authorOosterloo, Jen
dc.contributor.authorAlfani, Pen
dc.contributor.authorSang, Sen
dc.contributor.authorLenglet, Aen
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, DLen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-08T14:29:06Z
dc.date.available2018-05-08T14:29:06Z
dc.date.issued2018-04
dc.date.submitted2018-04-30
dc.identifier.citationLearning from water treatment and hygiene interventions in response to a hepatitis E outbreak in an open setting in Chad. 2018, 16 (2):223-232 J Water Healthen
dc.identifier.issn1477-8920
dc.identifier.pmid29676758
dc.identifier.doi10.2166/wh.2018.258
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/619121
dc.description.abstractIn September 2016, Médecins Sans Frontières responded to a hepatitis E (HEV) outbreak in Chad by implementing water treatment and hygiene interventions. To evaluate the coverage and use of these interventions, we conducted a cross-sectional study in the community. Our results showed that 99% of households interviewed had received a hygiene kit from us, aimed at improving water handling practice and personal hygiene and almost all respondents had heard messages about preventing jaundice and handwashing. Acceptance of chlorination of drinking water was also very high, although at the time of interview, we were only able to measure a safe free residual chlorine level (free chlorine residual (FRC) ≥0.2 mg/L) in 43% of households. Households which had refilled water containers within the last 18 hours, had sourced water from private wells or had poured water into a previously empty container, were all more likely to have a safe FRC level. In this open setting, we were able to achieve high coverage for chlorination, hygiene messaging and hygiene kit ownership; however, a review of our technical practice is needed in order to maintain safe FRC levels in drinking water in households, particularly when water is collected from multiple sources, stored and mixed with older water.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIWA Publishingen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Water and Healthen
dc.titleLearning from water treatment and hygiene interventions in response to a hepatitis E outbreak in an open setting in Chaden
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Water and Healthen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T13:53:05Z
html.description.abstractIn September 2016, Médecins Sans Frontières responded to a hepatitis E (HEV) outbreak in Chad by implementing water treatment and hygiene interventions. To evaluate the coverage and use of these interventions, we conducted a cross-sectional study in the community. Our results showed that 99% of households interviewed had received a hygiene kit from us, aimed at improving water handling practice and personal hygiene and almost all respondents had heard messages about preventing jaundice and handwashing. Acceptance of chlorination of drinking water was also very high, although at the time of interview, we were only able to measure a safe free residual chlorine level (free chlorine residual (FRC) ≥0.2 mg/L) in 43% of households. Households which had refilled water containers within the last 18 hours, had sourced water from private wells or had poured water into a previously empty container, were all more likely to have a safe FRC level. In this open setting, we were able to achieve high coverage for chlorination, hygiene messaging and hygiene kit ownership; however, a review of our technical practice is needed in order to maintain safe FRC levels in drinking water in households, particularly when water is collected from multiple sources, stored and mixed with older water.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Spina et al - 2018 - Learning ...
Size:
221.8Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record