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dc.contributor.authorNyirandagijimana, B
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, JK
dc.contributor.authorVenables, E
dc.contributor.authorAli, E
dc.contributor.authorRusangwa, C
dc.contributor.authorMukasakindi, H
dc.contributor.authorBorg, R
dc.contributor.authorFabien, M
dc.contributor.authorTharcisse, M
dc.contributor.authorNshimyiryo, A
dc.contributor.authorPark, PH
dc.contributor.authorRaviola, GJ
dc.contributor.authorSmith, SL
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-17T13:59:24Z
dc.date.available2018-05-17T13:59:24Z
dc.date.issued2017-09-21
dc.date.submitted2018-05-16
dc.identifier.citationClosing the gap: decentralising mental health care to primary care centres in one rural district of Rwanda. 2017, 7 (3):231-236 Public Health Actionen
dc.identifier.issn2220-8372
dc.identifier.pmid29201658
dc.identifier.doi10.5588/pha.16.0130
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/619122
dc.description.abstractSetting: Programmes that integrate mental health care into primary care settings could reduce the global burden of mental disorders by increasing treatment availability in resource-limited settings, including Rwanda. Objective: We describe patient demographics, service use and retention of patients in care at health centres (HC) participating in an innovative primary care integration programme, compared to patients using existing district hospital-based specialised out-patient care. Design: This was a retrospective cohort study using routinely collected data from six health centres and one district hospital from October 2014 to March 2015. Results: Of 709 patients, 607 were cared for at HCs; HCs accounted for 88% of the total visits for mental disorders. Patients with psychosis used HC services more frequently, while patients with affective disorders were seen more frequently at the district hospital. Of the 68% of patients who returned to care within 90 days of their first visit, 76% had a third visit within a further 90 days. There were no significant differences in follow-up rates between clinical settings. Conclusion: This study suggests that a programme of mentorship for primary care nurses can facilitate the decentralisation of out-patient mental health care from specialised district hospital mental health services to HCs in rural Rwanda.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseaseen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Public Health Actionen
dc.titleClosing the gap: decentralising mental health care to primary care centres in one rural district of Rwandaen
dc.identifier.journalPublic Health Actionen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T13:53:11Z
html.description.abstractSetting: Programmes that integrate mental health care into primary care settings could reduce the global burden of mental disorders by increasing treatment availability in resource-limited settings, including Rwanda. Objective: We describe patient demographics, service use and retention of patients in care at health centres (HC) participating in an innovative primary care integration programme, compared to patients using existing district hospital-based specialised out-patient care. Design: This was a retrospective cohort study using routinely collected data from six health centres and one district hospital from October 2014 to March 2015. Results: Of 709 patients, 607 were cared for at HCs; HCs accounted for 88% of the total visits for mental disorders. Patients with psychosis used HC services more frequently, while patients with affective disorders were seen more frequently at the district hospital. Of the 68% of patients who returned to care within 90 days of their first visit, 76% had a third visit within a further 90 days. There were no significant differences in follow-up rates between clinical settings. Conclusion: This study suggests that a programme of mentorship for primary care nurses can facilitate the decentralisation of out-patient mental health care from specialised district hospital mental health services to HCs in rural Rwanda.


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