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dc.contributor.authorGoncharova, O
dc.contributor.authorDenisiuk, O
dc.contributor.authorZachariah, R
dc.contributor.authorDavtyan, K
dc.contributor.authorNabirova, D
dc.contributor.authorAcosta, C
dc.contributor.authorKadyrov, A
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-17T14:12:22Z
dc.date.available2018-05-17T14:12:22Z
dc.date.issued2017-09-21
dc.date.submitted2018-05-16
dc.identifier.citationTuberculosis among migrants in Bishkek, the capital of the Kyrgyz Republic. 2017, 7 (3):218-223 Public Health Actionen
dc.identifier.issn2220-8372
dc.identifier.pmid29201657
dc.identifier.doi10.5588/pha.17.0002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/619132
dc.description.abstractSetting: Twenty-two first-line, two second-line and one tertiary health facility in Bishkek, the capital of Kyrgyzstan. Objectives: Among migrants, a marginalised population at risk for acquiring and transmitting tuberculosis (TB), we determined the proportion with TB among all registered TB cases. For those registered at primary-level facilities, we then reported on their demographic and clinical profiles and TB treatment outcomes. Design: This was a retrospective cohort analysis of 2012-2013 programme data. Results: Of 2153 TB patients registered in all health facilities, 969 (45%) were migrants, of whom 454 were registered in first-line facilities. Of these, 27% were cross-border migrants, 50% had infectious TB and 12% had drug-resistant TB. Treatment success was 74% for new cases and 44% for retreatment TB (the World Health Organization target is ⩾85%). Failure in new and retreatment TB patients was respectively 8% and 25%. Twenty-six individuals started on a first-line anti-tuberculosis regimen failed due to multidrug-resistant TB. Eight (25%) of 32 individuals on a retreatment TB regimen also failed. Loss to follow-up was 10% for new and 19% for retreatment TB. Conclusion: Migrants constituted almost half of all TB patients, drug resistance is prevalent and treatment outcomes unsatisfactory. Fostering inter-country collaboration and prioritising rapid TB diagnostics (Xpert® MTB/RIF) and innovative ways forward for improving treatment outcomes is urgent.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseaseen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Public Health Actionen
dc.titleTuberculosis among migrants in Bishkek, the capital of the Kyrgyz Republicen
dc.identifier.journalPublic Health Actionen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T13:54:12Z
html.description.abstractSetting: Twenty-two first-line, two second-line and one tertiary health facility in Bishkek, the capital of Kyrgyzstan. Objectives: Among migrants, a marginalised population at risk for acquiring and transmitting tuberculosis (TB), we determined the proportion with TB among all registered TB cases. For those registered at primary-level facilities, we then reported on their demographic and clinical profiles and TB treatment outcomes. Design: This was a retrospective cohort analysis of 2012-2013 programme data. Results: Of 2153 TB patients registered in all health facilities, 969 (45%) were migrants, of whom 454 were registered in first-line facilities. Of these, 27% were cross-border migrants, 50% had infectious TB and 12% had drug-resistant TB. Treatment success was 74% for new cases and 44% for retreatment TB (the World Health Organization target is ⩾85%). Failure in new and retreatment TB patients was respectively 8% and 25%. Twenty-six individuals started on a first-line anti-tuberculosis regimen failed due to multidrug-resistant TB. Eight (25%) of 32 individuals on a retreatment TB regimen also failed. Loss to follow-up was 10% for new and 19% for retreatment TB. Conclusion: Migrants constituted almost half of all TB patients, drug resistance is prevalent and treatment outcomes unsatisfactory. Fostering inter-country collaboration and prioritising rapid TB diagnostics (Xpert® MTB/RIF) and innovative ways forward for improving treatment outcomes is urgent.


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