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dc.contributor.authorAzman, AS
dc.contributor.authorLuquero, FJ
dc.contributor.authorSalje, H
dc.contributor.authorNaibei Mbaïbardoum, N
dc.contributor.authorAdalbert, N
dc.contributor.authorAli, M
dc.contributor.authorBertuzzo, E
dc.contributor.authorFinger, F
dc.contributor.authorToure, B
dc.contributor.authorMassing, LA
dc.contributor.authorRamazani, R
dc.contributor.authorSaga, B
dc.contributor.authorAllan, M
dc.contributor.authorOlson, D
dc.contributor.authorLeglise, J
dc.contributor.authorPorten, K
dc.contributor.authorLessler, J
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-12T14:54:21Z
dc.date.available2018-06-12T14:54:21Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-11
dc.date.submitted2018-06-04
dc.identifier.citationMicro-hotspots of Risk in Urban Cholera Epidemics. 2018 J. Infect. Dis.en
dc.identifier.issn1537-6613
dc.identifier.pmid29757428
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/infdis/jiy283
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/619173
dc.description.abstractTargeted interventions have been delivered to neighbors of cholera cases in major epidemic responses globally despite limited evidence for the impact of such targeting. Using data from urban epidemics in Chad and D.R. Congo we estimate the extent of spatiotemporal zones of increased cholera risk around cases. In both cities, we found zones of increased risk of at least 200-meters during the 5-days immediately following case presentation to a clinic. Risk was highest for those living closest to cases and diminished in time and space similarly across settings. These results provide a rational basis for rapidly delivering targeting interventions.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.rightsPublished by Infectious Diseases Society of America Archived on this site with permission and copyright 200X by the Infectious Diseases Society of America, [url] and Oxford University Pressen
dc.titleMicro-hotspots of Risk in Urban Cholera Epidemicsen
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of Infectious Diseasesen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T14:01:18Z
html.description.abstractTargeted interventions have been delivered to neighbors of cholera cases in major epidemic responses globally despite limited evidence for the impact of such targeting. Using data from urban epidemics in Chad and D.R. Congo we estimate the extent of spatiotemporal zones of increased cholera risk around cases. In both cities, we found zones of increased risk of at least 200-meters during the 5-days immediately following case presentation to a clinic. Risk was highest for those living closest to cases and diminished in time and space similarly across settings. These results provide a rational basis for rapidly delivering targeting interventions.


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