Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMcDiarmid, M
dc.contributor.authorCrestani, R
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-20T02:11:41Z
dc.date.available2019-11-20T02:11:41Z
dc.date.issued2019-08-31
dc.date.submitted2019-11-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/619536
dc.description.abstractHealth workers were differentially infected during the 2014 to 2016 Ebola outbreak with an incidence rate of 30 to 44/1000 depending on their job duties, compared to the wider population’s rate of 1.4/1000, according to the WHO. Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) health workers had a much lower incidence rate of 4.3/1000, explained as the result of MSF’s ‘duty of care’ toward staff safety. Duty of care is defined as an obligation to conform to certain standards of conduct for the protection of others against an unreasonable risk of harm. The duty of care was operationalised through four actions: performing risk assessments prior to deployment, organising work and work practices to minimise exposure, providing extensive risk communication and training of staff and providing medical follow-up for staff exposures. Adopting and consistently enforcing these broader, duty of care safety policies in deployed teams augments and fortifies standard infection prevention practices, creating a more protective, comprehensive safety programme. Prioritising staff safety by taking such actions will help avoid the catastrophic loss of the health work force and assist in building resilient health systems.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Groupen_US
dc.rightsWith thanks to BMJ Publishing Group.en_US
dc.titleDuty of care and health worker protections in the age of Ebola: lessons from Médecins Sans Frontièresen_US
dc.identifier.journalBMJ Global Healthen_US
refterms.dateFOA2019-11-20T02:11:42Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
McDiarmid and Crestani 2019 Duty ...
Size:
217.5Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record