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dc.contributor.authorHacking, D
dc.contributor.authorCassidy, T
dc.contributor.authorMgengwana-Mbakaza, Z
dc.contributor.authorBoulle, A
dc.contributor.authorMathys, R
dc.contributor.authorRuneyi, P
dc.contributor.authorDuran, L
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-03T17:12:49Z
dc.date.available2020-01-03T17:12:49Z
dc.date.issued2019-12-10
dc.date.submitted2019-12
dc.identifier.issn1438-8871
dc.identifier.doi10.2196/14012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/619541
dc.description.abstractBackground: Youths in South Africa are poor utilizers of HIV health services. Medecins Sans Frontieres has been piloting youth-adapted services at a youth clinic in Khayelitsha, including a peer virtual mentorship program over mobile phones, piloted from March 2015 to May 2016. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the peer mentorship program on youth engagement with HIV services and explore the acceptability of the program to both mentors and mentees. Methods: Antiretroviral initiation, retention in care (RIC), and viral load suppression were compared between youths engaged in the virtual mentorship program and two matched controls. In-depth interviews were also conducted for 5 mentors and 5 mentees to explore acceptability and impact of the program. Results: A total of 40 youths were recruited into the virtual mentorship program over the study period. Of these, data were obtained for 35 and 2 matched controls were randomly sampled for each. There was no difference in baseline demographics (eg, age, gender, and CD4 count). Mentees had increased antiretroviral initiation (28/35, 80% vs 30/70, 42% in matched controls) and viral load completion (28/35, 80% vs 32/70, 45%); however, no differences were found in viral load suppression or RIC at 6 or 12 months. Mentors reported being motivated to participate in the program because of previous personal struggles with HIV and a desire to help their peers. Mentees reported fears of disclosure and lack of acceptance of their status as barrier to accessing services, but they felt free to talk to their mentors, valued the mentorship program, and indicated a preference for phone calls. Conclusions: Peer mentorship in youths is acceptable to both mentors and mentees and appears to increase linkage to care and viral load completion rates.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherJMIR Publications Inc.en_US
dc.rightsWith thanks to the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapyen_US
dc.subjectHealth Informatics
dc.titlePeer Mentorship via Mobile Phones for Newly Diagnosed HIV-Positive Youths in Clinic Care in Khayelitsha, South Africa: Mixed Methods Studyen_US
dc.typejournal-article
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapyen_US
dc.source.volume21
dc.source.issue12
dc.source.beginpagee14012
refterms.dateFOA2020-01-03T17:12:50Z


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