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dc.contributor.authorBroban, A
dc.contributor.authorVan den Bergh, R
dc.contributor.authorRussell, W
dc.contributor.authorBenedetti, G
dc.contributor.authorCaluwaerts, S
dc.contributor.authorOwiti, P
dc.contributor.authorReid, A
dc.contributor.authorDe Plecker, E
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-21T16:38:40Z
dc.date.available2020-10-21T16:38:40Z
dc.date.issued2020-08-04
dc.date.submitted2020-10-06
dc.identifier.pmid32750062
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0237060
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/619739
dc.description.abstractBackground: Often neglected, male-directed sexual violence (SV) has recently gained recognition as a significant issue. However, documentation of male SV patients, assaults and characteristics of presentation for care remains poor. Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) systematically documented these in all victims admitted to eleven SV clinics in seven African countries between 2011 and 2017, providing a unique opportunity to describe SV patterns in male cases compared to females, according to age categories and contexts, thereby improving their access to SV care. Methods and findings: This was a multi-centric, cross-sectional study using routine program data. The study included 13550 SV cases, including 1009 males (7.5%). Proportions of males varied between programs and contexts, with the highest being recorded in migratory contexts (12.7%). Children (<13yrs) represented 34.3% of males. Different SV patterns appeared between younger and older males; while male children and adolescents were more often assaulted by known civilians, without physical violence, adult males more often endured violent assault, perpetrated by authority figures. Male patients presented more frequently to clinics providing integrated care (medical and psychological) for victims of violence (odds ratio 3.3, 95%CI 2.4-4.6), as compared to other types of clinics where SV disclosure upon admission was necessary. Males, particularly adults, were disproportionately more likely to suffer being compelled to rape (odds ratio 12.9, 95%CI 7.6-21.8).Retention in SV care was similar for males and females. Conclusions: Patterns of male-directed SV varied considerably according to contexts and age categories. A key finding was the importance of the clinic setup; integrated medical and SV clinics, where initial disclosure was not necessary to access care, appeared more likely to meet males' needs, while accommodating females' ones. All victims' needs should be considered when planning SV services, with an emphasis on appropriately trained and trauma-informed medical staff, health promotion activities and increased psychosocial support.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Sciencesen_US
dc.rightsWith thanks to the Public Library of Science.en_US
dc.titleAssault and care characteristics of victims of sexual violence in eleven Médecins Sans Frontières programs in Africa. What about men and boys?en_US
dc.typeArticle
dc.typeOther
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
dc.identifier.journalPloS Oneen_US
dc.source.journaltitlePloS one
dc.source.volume15
dc.source.issue8
dc.source.beginpagee0237060
dc.source.endpage
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-21T16:38:41Z
dc.source.countryUnited States


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