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dc.contributor.authorNewman, L
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, B
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, V
dc.contributor.authorNewhouse, G
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-19T17:29:50Z
dc.date.available2020-11-19T17:29:50Z
dc.date.issued2020-09-10
dc.date.submitted2020-11-04
dc.identifier.pmid32910693
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1039856220956251
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/619774
dc.descriptionWe regret that this article is behind a paywall.en_US
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Between 2013 and 2019, an estimated 200 children seeking asylum in Australia were detained on the island of Nauru. In 2018, 15 of these children developed the rare and life-threatening pervasive refusal syndrome (PRS). This paper describes the PRS case cluster, the complexities faced by clinicians managing these cases, and the lessons that can be learned from this outbreak. Conclusions: The emergence of PRS on Nauru highlighted the risks of long-term detention of children in settings that are unable to meet their physical and psycho-social needs. The case cluster also underscored (a) the difficulties faced by doctors working in conditions where their medical and legal obligations may be in direct conflict, and (b) the role of clinicians in patient advocacy.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen_US
dc.subjectasylum seekers
dc.subjectimmigration detention
dc.subjectpervasive refusal syndrome
dc.titlePervasive refusal syndrome in child asylum seekers on Nauru.en_US
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.eissn1440-1665
dc.identifier.journalAustralasian Psychiatryen_US
dc.source.journaltitleAustralasian psychiatry : bulletin of Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists
dc.source.volume28
dc.source.issue5
dc.source.beginpage585
dc.source.endpage588
dc.source.countryEngland


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