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dc.contributor.authorAmsalu, R
dc.contributor.authorSchute-Hillen, C
dc.contributor.authorGarcia, DM
dc.contributor.authorLafferty, N
dc.contributor.authorMorris, CN
dc.contributor.authorGee, S
dc.contributor.authorAkseer, N
dc.contributor.authorScudder, E
dc.contributor.authorSami, S
dc.contributor.authorBarasa, SO
dc.contributor.authorHad, H
dc.contributor.authorMaalim, MF
dc.contributor.authorMoluh, S
dc.contributor.authorBerkelhamer, S
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-19T17:34:29Z
dc.date.available2020-11-19T17:34:29Z
dc.date.issued2020-10-01
dc.date.submitted2020-11-04
dc.identifier.pmid33004642
dc.identifier.doi10.1542/peds.2020-016915L
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/619778
dc.description.abstractHumanitarian crises, driven by disasters, conflict, and disease epidemics, have profound effects on society, including on people's health and well-being. Occurrences of conflict by state and nonstate actors have increased in the last 2 decades: by the end of 2018, an estimated 41.3 million internally displaced persons and 20.4 million refugees were reported worldwide, representing a 70% increase from 2010. Although public health response for people affected by humanitarian crisis has improved in the last 2 decades, health actors have made insufficient progress in the use of evidence-based interventions to reduce neonatal mortality. Indeed, on average, conflict-affected countries report higher neonatal mortality rates and lower coverage of key maternal and newborn health interventions compared with non-conflict-affected countries. As of 2018, 55.6% of countries with the highest neonatal mortality rate (≥30 per 1000 live births) were affected by conflict and displacement. Systematic use of new evidence-based interventions requires the availability of a skilled health workforce and resources as well as commitment of health actors to implement interventions at scale. A review of the implementation of the Helping Babies Survive training program in 3 refugee responses and protracted conflict settings identify that this training is feasible, acceptable, and effective in improving health worker knowledge and competency and in changing newborn care practices at the primary care and hospital level. Ultimately, to improve neonatal survival, in addition to a trained health workforce, reliable supply and health information system, community engagement, financial support, and leadership with effective coordination, policy, and guidance are required.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Academy of Pediatricsen_US
dc.rightsWith thanks to the American Academy of Pediatrics.en_US
dc.titleLessons Learned From Helping Babies Survive in Humanitarian Settings.en_US
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.eissn1098-4275
dc.identifier.journalPediatricsen_US
dc.source.journaltitlePediatrics
dc.source.volume146
dc.source.issueSuppl 2
dc.source.beginpageS208
dc.source.endpageS217
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-19T17:34:30Z
dc.source.countryUnited States


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