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dc.contributor.authorElnaiem, DA
dc.contributor.authorDakein, O
dc.contributor.authorAlawad, AM
dc.contributor.authorAlsharif, B
dc.contributor.authorKhogali, A
dc.contributor.authorJibreel, T
dc.contributor.authorOsman, OF
dc.contributor.authorHas'san, H
dc.contributor.authorAtia, AM
dc.contributor.authorElhag, M
dc.contributor.authorDen Boer, M
dc.contributor.authorRitmeijer, K
dc.contributor.authorBern, C
dc.contributor.authorAlvar, J
dc.contributor.authorKhalid, N
dc.contributor.authorCourtenay, O
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-05T16:47:46Z
dc.date.available2020-12-05T16:47:46Z
dc.date.issued2020-10-20
dc.date.submitted2020-12-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/619793
dc.description.abstractVisceral Leishmaniasis (VL) due to Leishmania donovani is a neglected protozoan parasitic disease in humans, which is usually fatal if untreated. Phlebotomus orientalis, the predominant VL vector in East Africa, is a highly exophilic/exophagic species that poses a major challenge to current Integrated Vector Management (IVM). Here we report results of pilot studies conducted in rural villages in Gedarif state, Sudan, to evaluate outdoor residual spraying of 20mg active ingredient (a.i.) /m2 deltamethrin insecticide applied to the characteristic household compound boundary reed fence and to the outside of household buildings (Outdoor Residual Insecticide Spraying, ODRS), and as an alternative, spraying restricted to the boundary fence only (Restricted Outdoor Residual Insecticide Spraying, RODRS). Four to six clusters of 20 households were assigned to insecticide treatments or control in three experiments. Changes in sand fly numbers were monitored over 2,033 trap-nights over 43–76 days follow-up in four sentinel houses per cluster relative to unsprayed control clusters. Sand fly numbers were monitored by sticky traps placed on the ground on the inside (“outdoor”) and the outside (“peridomestic”) of the boundary fence, and by CDC light traps suspended outdoors in the household compound. The effects of ODRS on sand fly numbers inside sleeping huts were monitored by insecticide knockdown. After a single application, ODRS reduced P. orientalis abundance by 83%-99% in outdoor and peridomestic trap locations. ODRS also reduced numbers of P. orientalis found resting inside sleeping huts. RODRS reduced outdoor and peridomestic P. orientalis by 60%-88%. By direct comparison, RODRS was 58%-100% as effective as ODRS depending on the trapping method. These impacts were immediate on intervention and persisted during follow-up, representing a large fraction of the P. orientalis activity season. Relative costs of ODRS and RODRS delivery were $5.76 and $3.48 per household, respectively. The study demonstrates the feasibility and high entomological efficacy of ODRS and RODRS, and the expected low costs relative to current IVM practises. These methods represent novel sand fly vector control tools against predominantly exophilic/exophagic sand fly vectors, aimed to lower VL burdens in Sudan, with potential application in other endemic regions in East Africa.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Sciencesen_US
dc.rightsWith thanks to the Public Library of Sciences.en_US
dc.titleOutdoor Residual Insecticide Spraying (ODRS), a New Approach for the Control of the Exophilic Vectors of Human Visceral Leishmaniasis: Phlebotomus orientalis in East Africaen_US
dc.identifier.journalPLOS Neglected Tropical Diseasesen_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-12-05T16:47:47Z


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