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dc.contributor.authorKobeissi, E
dc.contributor.authorMenassa, M
dc.contributor.authorMoussally, K
dc.contributor.authorRepetto, E
dc.contributor.authorSoboh, I
dc.contributor.authorHajjar, M
dc.contributor.authorSaleh, S
dc.contributor.authorAbu-Sittah, G
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-05T15:39:05Z
dc.date.available2021-07-05T15:39:05Z
dc.date.issued2021-04-06
dc.identifier.issn1752-1505
dc.identifier.pmid33823882
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13031-021-00357-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/619944
dc.description.abstractBackground Antibiotic resistance (ABR) is a major global threat. Armed and protracted conflicts act as multipliers of infection and ABR, thus leading to increased healthcare and societal costs. We aimed to understand and describe the socioeconomic burden of ABR in conflict-affected settings and refugee hosting countries by conducting a systematic scoping review. Methods A systematic search of PubMed, Medline (Ovid), Embase, Web of Science, SCOPUS and Open Grey databases was conducted to identify all relevant human studies published between January 1990 and August 2019. An updated search was also conducted in April 2020 using Medline/Ovid. Independent screenings of titles/abstracts followed by full texts were performed using pre-defined criteria. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used to assess study quality. Data extraction and analysis were based on the PICOS framework and following the PRISMA-ScR guideline. Results The search yielded 8 studies (7 publications), most of which were single-country, mono-center and retrospective studies. The studies were conducted in Lebanon (n = 3), Iraq (n = 2), Jordan (n = 1), Palestine (n = 1) and Yemen (n = 1). Most of the studies did not have a primary aim to assess the socioeconomic impact of ABR and were small studies with limited statistical power that could not demonstrate significant associations. The included studies lacked sufficient information for the accurate evaluation of the cost incurred by antibiotic resistant infections in conflict-affected countries. Conclusion This review highlights the scarcity of research on the socioeconomic burden of ABR on general populations in conflict-affected settings and on refugees and migrants in host countries, and lists recommendations for consideration in future studies. Further studies are needed to understand the cost of ABR in these settings to develop and implement adaptable policies.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBMCen_US
dc.subjectAntibiotic resistance
dc.subjectConflict-affected
dc.subjectCost of illness
dc.subjectMulti-drug resistance
dc.subjectRefugee
dc.subjectSocioeconomic
dc.titleThe socioeconomic burden of antibiotic resistance in conflict-affected settings and refugee hosting countries: a systematic scoping review.en_US
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalConflict and healthen_US
dc.source.journaltitleConflict and health
dc.source.volume15
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage21
dc.source.endpage
refterms.dateFOA2021-07-05T15:39:06Z
dc.source.countryEngland


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