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dc.contributor.authorHuerga, H
dc.contributor.authorVasset, B
dc.contributor.authorPrados, E
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-25T15:01:59Z
dc.date.available2009-05-25T15:01:59Z
dc.date.issued2009-02-24
dc.date.submitted2009-05-11
dc.identifier.citationTrans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 2009;103(5):476-84en
dc.identifier.issn0035-9203
dc.identifier.pmid19243803
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.trstmh.2008.12.004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/68913
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to describe and analyse hospital mortality patterns after the Liberian war. Data were collected retrospectively from January to July 2005 in a referral hospital in Monrovia, Liberia. The overall fatality rate was 17.2% (438/2543) of medical admissions. One-third of deaths occurred in the first 24h. The adult fatality rate was 23.3% (241/1034). Non-infectious diseases accounted for 56% of the adult deaths. The main causes of death were meningitis (16%), stroke (14%) and heart failure (10%). Associated fatality rates were 48%, 54% and 31% respectively. The paediatric fatality rate was 13.1% (197/1509). Infectious diseases caused 66% of paediatric deaths. In infants <1 month old, the fatality rate was 18% and main causes of death were neonatal sepsis (47%), respiratory distress (24%) and prematurity (18%). The main causes of death in infants > or =1 month old were respiratory infections (27%), malaria (23%) and severe malnutrition (16%). Associated fatality rates were 12%, 10% and 19%. Fatality rates were similar to those found in other sub-Saharan countries without a previous conflict. Early deaths could decrease through recognition and early referral of severe cases from health centres to the hospital and through assessment and priority treatment of these patients at arrival.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.trstmh.2008.12.004en
dc.rightsPublished by Elsevier Archived on this site with the kind permission of Elsevier Ltd. ([url]http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/00359203[/url]) and the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene ([url]http://www.rstmh.org/transactions.asp[/url])en
dc.subject.meshMortalityen
dc.subject.meshLiberiaen
dc.subject.meshPediatricsen
dc.subject.meshWaren
dc.titleAdult and paediatric mortality patterns in a referral hospital in Liberia 1 year after the end of the waren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMédecins Sans Frontières-France, Kenya Programme, Paris, France; Clinica de Medicina Forense, Segovia, Spainen
dc.identifier.journalTransactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygieneen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T14:20:20Z
html.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to describe and analyse hospital mortality patterns after the Liberian war. Data were collected retrospectively from January to July 2005 in a referral hospital in Monrovia, Liberia. The overall fatality rate was 17.2% (438/2543) of medical admissions. One-third of deaths occurred in the first 24h. The adult fatality rate was 23.3% (241/1034). Non-infectious diseases accounted for 56% of the adult deaths. The main causes of death were meningitis (16%), stroke (14%) and heart failure (10%). Associated fatality rates were 48%, 54% and 31% respectively. The paediatric fatality rate was 13.1% (197/1509). Infectious diseases caused 66% of paediatric deaths. In infants <1 month old, the fatality rate was 18% and main causes of death were neonatal sepsis (47%), respiratory distress (24%) and prematurity (18%). The main causes of death in infants > or =1 month old were respiratory infections (27%), malaria (23%) and severe malnutrition (16%). Associated fatality rates were 12%, 10% and 19%. Fatality rates were similar to those found in other sub-Saharan countries without a previous conflict. Early deaths could decrease through recognition and early referral of severe cases from health centres to the hospital and through assessment and priority treatment of these patients at arrival.


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