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dc.contributor.authorSimon, S
dc.contributor.authorChu, K
dc.contributor.authorFrieden, M
dc.contributor.authorCandrinho, B
dc.contributor.authorFord, N
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, H
dc.contributor.authorBiot, M
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-23T09:32:56Z
dc.date.available2009-07-23T09:32:56Z
dc.date.issued2009-07-17
dc.identifier.citationAn integrated approach of community health worker support for HIV/AIDS and TB care in Mozambique. 2009, 9 (1):13notBMC Int Health Hum Rightsen
dc.identifier.issn1472-698X
dc.identifier.pmid19615049
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1472-698X-9-13
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/75118
dc.description.abstractABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The need to scale up treatment for HIV/AIDS has led to a revival in community health workers to help alleviate the health human resource crisis in sub-Saharan Africa. Community health workers have been employed in Mozambique since the 1970s, performing disparate and fragmented activities, with mixed results. METHODS: A participant-observer description of the evolution of community health worker support to the health services in Angonia district, Mozambique. RESULTS: An integrated community health team approach, established jointly by the Ministry of Health and Medecins Sans Frontieres in 2007, has improved accountability, relevance, and geographical access for basic health services. CONCLUSIONS: The community health team has several advantages over 'disease-specific' community health worker approaches in terms of accountability, acceptability, and expanded access to care.
dc.languageENG
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to BMC international Health and Human Rights and Open Accessen
dc.titleAn integrated approach of community health worker support for HIV/AIDS and TB care in Mozambique.en
dc.identifier.journalBMC International Health and Human Rightsen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T14:25:23Z
html.description.abstractABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The need to scale up treatment for HIV/AIDS has led to a revival in community health workers to help alleviate the health human resource crisis in sub-Saharan Africa. Community health workers have been employed in Mozambique since the 1970s, performing disparate and fragmented activities, with mixed results. METHODS: A participant-observer description of the evolution of community health worker support to the health services in Angonia district, Mozambique. RESULTS: An integrated community health team approach, established jointly by the Ministry of Health and Medecins Sans Frontieres in 2007, has improved accountability, relevance, and geographical access for basic health services. CONCLUSIONS: The community health team has several advantages over 'disease-specific' community health worker approaches in terms of accountability, acceptability, and expanded access to care.


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